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Posts Tagged ‘2014 World Championship’

Bjergsen

 

How was travelling between so many countries? Where was your favorite? Was it difficult adjusting to jet lag?

Bjergsen: Travelling between so many countries was something I really enjoyed, it was awesome to see so many different cultures and try a lot of different foods. My favorite was probably Korea, since it was the one we got to experience the most outside of practice times. I think fighting jetlag should only take a couple days as long as  you try to keep a healthy schedule and don’t stay up for too long. You just need to make sure you resist taking naps, it can be difficult!

 

What was boot camp like? Of all of the teams you scrimmed, who do you feel was the strongest? What did you learn most from scrims?

Bjergsen:  Boot camping was a different experience. I’ve only really had one boot camp in my life with NiP before. I think in boot camps, you figure out a lot of team problems that need to be fixed because you’re constantly practicing in a high pressure environment where all emotions come out. We definitely had some things come up, but I think we got a good hold of them which made us a better team after the boot camp was over. Of all the teams we played Samsung White was definitely the hardest, the first time we played against them we got completely stomped, but slowly worked our way up to actually contest and take games from them in scrims. The thing I learned the most is to give back to my teammates, and use my advantage to help build their advantage. If I start winning my lane I know a lot more about the options I can do to help snowball the overall team and winning the game.

 

Who was the strongest mid laner you faced during scrims?

Bjergsen: I think Faker and Pawn both played exceptionally well and had very little mistakes when I played them. They both know their limits very well and push them as far as they can, that’s what makes a great player.

 

Who was the toughest opponent you played during group stages? Did any team at the tournament surprise you?

Bjergsen:  The toughest opponent was definitely Royal Club which also shows since they made it into the final. Royal has a very distinct play style and we played right into their strengths the first game which made us basically unable to win since they play that style so well. I think if anything the biggest surprise was how handedly OMG beat Najin White Shield, I was not expecting them to get a clean sweep, nor do I think anyone did.

 

What was your mindset headed into the quarterfinals? There was a lot of talk about the importance of believing you can defeat your opponent and how it can affect you mentally if you don’t think you are capable. Did you believe you could win? What went wrong?

Bjergsen:  It’s a difficult thing to say, I do believe we had a good shot at making it all the way to the finals this year with the way the brackets worked out. But obviously we failed to deliver and I can’t blame that on anyone else than us.

Reginald and Locodoco kept making sure that we all believed we had a chance at winning, no matter how small it was. I definitely agree if we didn’t believe we at least had a chance at winning there was no way we were going to win. I think everyone in the team knew they were the better team, but we still had ways to beat them, and we could still show up big on the day. I personally believed we could win, and I think for the most part my teammates believed we had a chance as well.  

 

What is your overall impression of the tournament so far?

Bjergsen: I think the way Riot has handled the tournament and the players has been really good and I very much enjoyed finally being a part of Worlds. I was also very happy that the wildcard teams ended up having such a big impact, even though it was to my good friends in Alliance. It really shows that you can’t just expect a win against these wildcard teams, they can take you on any given day.  

 

What is the biggest thing you’ve learned from playing internationally?

Bjergsen:  The biggest thing I’ve learned is how to be able to work together as a team and how to play for the benefit of the team. One player shouldn’t have to perform extraordinarily to win, everyone just has to have a solid performance and everyone helps each other out to have a solid performance. It’s a team game and Samsung White really shows that; they win together.  

 

Amazing recently stepped down from the starting lineup. What are your thoughts on his departure? Moving forward, what are you most looking for in finding a replacement? What do you think most fits your and the team’s needs?

Bjergsen: Of course I’m really sad Amazing decided to leave the team. I shared rooms in the hotel and housing with him through the entire boot camp and he became a good friend of mine in the team. I do understand all his reasons for leaving and I can’t be upset at him, I hope he finds a place where he’ll be happy and has an escape from League every once in a while.

The main things we are looking for in a jungler would be mechanical skill, communication and work ethic. Obviously it’s really important to have good mechanical skill as a jungler for champions like Lee Sin, etc. Communication as a jungler is very important since you have to be in a dialogue with all 3 lanes at the same time to know where to be and what to do next. Work ethic is a global thing you would want from every member in the team, but it’s very important to me. It’s important the player is motivated and willing to constantly improve through solo queue and replays.

 

Prediction for the Finals?

Bjergsen:  I have to go with White, they’re an amazing team and will likely 3-0 Royal if they do their research.

 

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About the author: Tim Kimbirk is an eSports Journalist and writer with Solomid. Stay up to date on the latest interviews and features by following on twitter: @CaymusNoL