Archive

Posts Tagged ‘esports news’

604169ae8c4436f4d1305a539475a6fe-ab17a8f685abfebffdf3f861ede4efe7

 

We last spoke in September, just after you requalified for the LCS with Gambit. A lot has changed since then, with you joining a brand new team as well as organization. What are your thoughts on the Gambit situation looking back, and what is it like being a part of the debut squad under a new banner?

A lot of things have changed indeed. I find it very refreshing to be playing with 4 new guys that have not played with each other aside from the bottom lane. On top of that, to play under a French organization with a really competent staff is great as well, though I do cherish some of the moments I spent with Gambit.

 

Is Vitality the strongest team you’ve been on? What sets them apart from your previous squads?

Yes definitely. Even if I’ve played in the past with talented and experienced people such as Diamond, Edward, Forg1ven, etc. I feel like this time we all have the same drive to become the best, and the tools to achieve that.

 

You play a carry oriented style and currently boast one of the highest KDA’s in the LCS. Is this your preferred way to play or is it just what fits into the team? What is the ideal way to play Top in your opinion?

At the moment you can basically play everything on top lane so if I had to say what ideal way there was to play top it would be to adapt properly and to be able to play some Kennen, right after some Poppy, followed by Fiora and you can even put a little Graves in the mix.  All of those champions have different purposes and way of being played. Even though we have mostly played with carry style champions in LCS we know we’re able to play with non-resource dependent champions in the top lane so that’s not really an issue.

 

You’ve always been an avid Kennen player, and this season you’ve already played him twice. Is he on par with other top liners, or is he still strictly a niche pick? What is the best situation to pick him in and do you expect him to be relevant for the foreseeable future?

Kennen is a decent pick since almost no one can bully him out of the lane. He also has really strong team fighting and is one of the best teleport flankers in the game. There are ways to play around it though; when you play against a Janna, a Poppy, a Lee Sin or an Alistar it becomes very hard to flank, since they can all push you away or put you out of the fight, and your champion in team fights rely entirely on you landing your ultimate on as many people as you can. He has a pretty good split-push for the early and midgame but when people start to get items it’s time to group. I find him interesting since he’s one of the few AP top laners still played alongside Ryze/ Lulu/ Lissandra despite them falling out of meta currently, however I wouldn’t consider him an S tier top laner but more like the most optimal pick in some situations.

 

On the meta, how are you enjoying Season 6 so far? What do you like or dislike most? If anything, what would you change? What has been your favorite competitive meta thus far?

I do enjoy the current meta since you need a lot of adaptability to play all those different picks. I think it came down to all the reworked champions being overpowered such as Quinn/Graves/Poppy/Fiora/Darius. Not sure I’d change anything, even if we still see TP played every game, it adds more strategy to the game. I very much liked the Jax/Irelia meta, when I felt even if the champions were pretty strong compared to the other lanes a lot of those matchups were purely based on skill, and quite snowbally. But right now I’m able to play some Graves or Lucian top so I won’t complain.

 

Would you define Vitality as a Top, Mid, or Bottom focused team? What are the team’s goals in game?

I don’t think if you strive to become the best you can, in the current meta, focus on a specific lane. I think it’s more dependent on champions picked after the draft and the situation in game, whether it be lane swapping, objective control, etc.

For example if I’m playing a Fiora top, it’s a pick that will require resources and therefore needs to be played around, with jungle pressure and lane assignment so you need to compensate and have a bottom lane that can play a bit more passively. Lucian and Janna for example.

On the other hand if we just want to have a composition with a Lulu mid and hyper carry bot like a Jinx, you’ll need for Jinx not to fall behind, so playing a pick like Poppy that can handle themselves and have a useful kit even if she doesn’t have the most resources will be the best in this situation. It’s obviously more complicated than that and a lot of it is down to applying pressure at the correct time.

 

Q:  There has been some commentary on teams being able to defend or turtle a game out long enough to just win a team fight and close the game from there, overriding poor play in earlier stages of the game. What are your thoughts on this and do you think better teams will prevail regardless?

I guess you can take our game vs UOL as an example of it, even if we didn’t manage to actually win the game there were some comebacks, but it mostly came down to us not respecting them early on and falling behind when we would out scale them regardless. They fought when they needed to, and we didn’t. In the current meta the game is very snowbally so it’s actually pretty hard to comeback if the enemy control objectives and apply pressure properly Lane assignment becomes really important with how the game is evolving.

 

What was the thought behind the Top lane Lucian pick and what situations does he work in? Have you practiced with him as a team? Do you expect to see more of it?

Lucian is a very strong lane bully and is pretty strong in lane swap scenarios as well due to his fast push and decent wave clear. I find the champion very mechanically rewarding, and he doesn’t necessarily require as much gold as when he is played as an ADC since you don’t build him around critical strike. We indeed practiced him as a team, on top of playing it quite a lot in solo queue.
How is the communication handled in game and what is the team environment like?

The bottom lane and especially KaSing will do most of the shot-calling and map rotations, with every player giving input about how’s their lane is going, how chunked the enemy is, dive possibility, teleport advantage, etc. The objective is to get to the point where once laning phase is over, every player knows exactly where he belongs in a certain situation to correctly apply pressure and control objectives.

 

Where do you expect to place at the end of the season? Predictions for Top 3?

At the end of the split we expect to be the best, I don’t really know who will be top 3 alongside us 😉

 

In week 5, you handed G2 their second loss and completely dismantled Origen. Is this the team ramping up and do you expect to keep getting better?

I think our improvement curve is going really well, I still remember us a few weeks ago being completely lost in some situations. Right now things looks better but we still have a lot of things to fix so we will definitely get better throughout the split and going into playoffs!

 

In your game against Origen, you ran a team comp with Zilean and Bard. What went into the draft for this game and what was your mindset heading in? Did things play out as expected?

We practiced this mid/support duo in scrims and they’ve got quite good synergy. Being able to put the double bomb damage + free stun on top of the golden bard ultimate is deadly. On top of that it’s not like the trade-off is bad while picking them, because in those matchups they were good during the laning phase as well. At the end of the draft we had a scenario we expected, plus the supportive mid pick allowed me to pick a more damage oriented top laner that could do some AD damage too because we basically had 3 AP champions.

 

Shoutouts?

Thanks for everyone supporting me and my team, much love and Cabane 123!

 

 

 

photo credit: lolesports


Caymus is a journalist and content creator for SoloMid. You can find him getting caught out in the depths of solo queue, or on twitter talking about Esports.

Comments off

 
gyxx1y1mjik34ggz51pq8zew83364yx9 (1)

Putting up impressive numbers in the first few weeks of the 2016 season, I caught up with Unicorns of Love AD Carry Pierre “Steelback” Mejaldi to talk about his return to Europe, playing on a new team, the current meta, and more.

 

Q: You spent some time playing in North America on Team Imagine before joining Unicorns of Love. Did you enjoy your time there? Do you prefer playing in Europe?

Yes I enjoyed playing there. It was something totally new and a different mindset than EU players. I felt happy when I was in NA because I met really nice people and it gave me the opportunity to grow as a player.

 

Q: What was your mindset like heading into the season? Was there any difficulty in adjusting to a new team?

My mindset was to perform to my own expectations. I knew that I improved a lot but I didn’t want to fail to adapt properly on stage. There wasn’t really any difficulty because everyone is really experienced which make things way easier.

 

Q: What is it like playing with Hylissang and what is the biggest difference between him and BIG/Baby or Yellowstar?

Well the biggest difference is in the laning phase aggression. Hylissang is very aggressive in lane which I like. Baby was kind of the same too. Yellowstar was more control and roamed way more which was also good, it’s just two different playstyles.

 

Q: What type of role do you feel fits you best and do you feel it meshes well with the team?

I feel that I can play way more aggressive in this team and play more how I feel.  I felt that I wasn’t playing my own playstyle before, and I really didn’t like playing passively so now I’m quite happy that I can just play natural and that everyone has the possibility to be a carry.

 

Q: What is the team environment like? What is communication like in game and how is shotcalling handled?

The team environment is pretty good. Everyone is willing to improve and plays the game a lot. We talk way more than my previous team and I think it’s really nice. You always needs to say what’s on your mind with shotcalling, and everyone is doing it pretty much which I think is the best cause everyone should be able to understand what would be the best move possible at what time.

 

Q: You played week with Djoko due to visa issues with Diamondprox. How much has this affected the team? What is the most noticeable difference in his absence?

Djoko played better than everyone expected, I’m sure he had confidence on stage to make plays. The absence of Diamondprox affected us obviously because he was a top tier jungler and had a lot of experience, he was helping the shotcalling a lot. I’d say the most noticeable difference is the experience and the knowledge that he has with every match up which is really huge.

 

Q: Last year, you said you wanted to see more Ezreal in the LCS. In 2016, he rounds out the top 10 most played champions in the EU LCS. Do you still enjoy playing him?

Yes I really enjoy Ezreal even though his laning phase is not the best at the moment due to his tear build. I still like him because you’re able to poke and make plays with him.

 

What in your eyes makes him so strong?

I feel his strongest point is his poke and his ability to peel for yourself and I think that people forget a lot about how to use his ult efficiently. For example clearing waves and harassing the enemy.

 

Q: How would you rate your performance so far? Who do you feel is the biggest competition among AD Carries in EU?

I’m happy that people noticed that I improved but I still think that I can do way more. People shouldn’t forget that my team is really good, which is a huge reason why I’ve looked good at the beginning of the season. I think there are a lot of good AD carries that I can learn from and we will see how it goes during the season.

 

Q: Of the teams you’ve played, who was most difficult to play against?

Well I think Fnatic was the most difficult cause they managed to stall the game for super long even though they were really behind. I feel that we lost to G2 and Origen because mostly because of draft.

 

Q: How do you feel about the state of the current meta? Specifically AD Carries? Are there any changes you’d like to see in the game?

I feel that the current meta is pretty good because it’s more about aggressive plays all over the map and there are way less tanks. Also, on AD carries you can build differently depending on which ADC you pick. Same for masteries, before there was one only way to take masteries and build AD carries.

 

Q: Shoutouts?

I just want to thank every fan that support us. It helps a lot, you guys are awesome keep it up!

 

 

photo credit: lolesports


Caymus is a journalist and content creator for SoloMid. You can find him getting caught out in the depths of solo queue, or on twitter talking about Esports.

Title-Header

 

Top scorers points earned for week 1

  1. Shiphtur – Dignitas: 60.27 points
  2. Piglet – Liquid: 58.89 points
  3. Freeze – Renegades: 48.31 points
  4. WildTurtle – Immortals: 48.29 points
  5. Fenix – Liquid: 47.84 points
  6. Trick – G2: 47.09 points
  7. Kiwikid – Dignitas: 45.69 points
  8. Altec – NRG: 45.65 points
  9. FORG1VENGRE – H2K: 45.45 points
  10. Stixxay – CLG: 44.17 points

 

First impressions from Week 1

  • Immortals look amazing. I’m happy to give especially Reignover and Turtle higher priority. I get the feeling Fnatic’s early game shotcalling last season was heavily directed by Reignover, although I can’t prove it, but that usually means a lot of fights. Turtle’s back to his aggresive self too so he’ll be awesome.
  • We have yet to see Dignitas fight upper tier teams (NRG had subs, so it didn’t count), but their point gain versus middle pack teams is amazing. Pay attention to their matchups, and Shiphtur may very well get you 50+ points in a week.
  • NRG’s question marks to me at the moment are KonKwon and Moon. Their other players look great though. They did very well this week, but it would be great to see how much Moon influences the tide of their games.
  • CLG is looking alright. Heavy rotations still in play, but lots of diving and teamfighting as well. I still have questions about Huhi, but I think Stixxay deserves a spot on the map.
  • Liquid‘s members are looking to be very good fantasy point generators, even though they’re 0-2. I don’t know if I should include Matt on the list yet, however, and the whole sub squad thing does not help their case. Be careful about running them, because if they’re subbed out midweek you’re in trouble.
  • TSM and Origen I think had off weeks… I’d have to see their week 2 play to decisively lower any of their positions, since apparently neither team had much practice coming into this week. Also Doublelift randomly got high points, so he’s working that + status well.
  • Renegades seem to have a pretty rotation heavy style (ode to MonteCristo I suppose). Their teamfighting seems alright though, so I’m happy to give small boosts to some of their members.
  • Consider fielding players who get to play against TiP. TiP is looking very weak, and that’s exploitable.
  • UoL looks pretty good. Diamond and Viziscasci have decent synergy, and their new bot lane have been performing acceptably. They’ll put up a good fight regardless of their opponent, so I expect good things to come from them. However, I’m still not convinced about the nature of their aggression. Their points seem to be above average, so I’m keeping an eye on them.
  • I’m still unsure about Echo Fox, Fnatic, G2, and Roccat. Fnatic moreso because they had one decent game against an out-of-form Origen, and because they had one terrible game against Vitality.
  • H2K is looking fantastic as well, but they seemed to play more rotationally as opposed to aggressively. I feel like they’ll get consistently high points, but absurd maximums will be rare.
  • Vitality’s performance looks to be about whether or not Shook wakes up right that day. I’ve lowered Kasing and Hjarnan temporarily for now, but there’s a good chance I might bump them back up again.
  • Elements, Giants, and Splyce did not impress me at all last week.

Based on these impressions, I have slightly adjusted the Drafting Priority for Week 2. Notice the tonne of new additions. Below the list, I’ve done a small run down for notable Week 2 matches that might be worth setting up your roster for.


 

W2-Recommended-Picks

 

Notable Week 2 Matches

Average points per game ~= 20 per player. The games I note are ones I expect to be higher than average or lower than average in certain ways. If I don’t note something, it’s because I either don’t think it’s worth mentioning, or I think it’ll give average points.

Team Impulse vs. Cloud9

  • Probably a convincing C9 win. Rush, Sneaky, and Jensen expected to do exceedingly well here.

TSM vs. Immortals

  • Slanted in favour of Immortals, probably 65-35 odds from TSM’s poor showing this week.
  • TSM looks to be good at putting up fights, so they (Doublelift and Bjergsen especially) should be able to net decent scores.
  • IMT has a very aggressive style that has been successful so far. Unless TSM has found a way to completely shut them out, they should score quite well too.

Liquid vs. Counter Logic Gaming

  • Probably a bloodbath.
  • Liquid has a good record vs CLG in season games.
  • Pay attention to which players Liquid fields.
    • If Piglet, Dardoch, and Fenix are in, I think they’re bound to get lots of points.
  • Also, if Liquid beats CLG like they have in the past, expect it to be a stomp (low CLG points).

NRG vs. Immortals

  • I expect a lot of kills to go both ways in this matchup.
    • Impact vs Huni, Pob vs GBM, Turtle vs Altec are all going to be crazy.
  • The question mark here will be Moon, and his performance will determine which way the points slant.
    • If he does well, NRG and Immortals should go even on points, but if he does poorly, Reignover’s going to take over.

Counter Logic Gaming vs. Cloud9

  • If C9 run hai, expect a lot of rotations, and an average to above average game for points.
  • This shouldn’t be a stalled out game. I expect a lot of proactive diving and skirmishing.
  • Whichever team wins this game will likely have a tonne of points from objectives.

Giants vs. G2 Esports

  • If both teams have the same showing at last week, I expect Trick, Emperor, and Perkz to have nutty points from this game.

Origen vs. Unicorns of Love

  • This game will probably have quite a bit of action going on, so I think points should be higher than average.
  • There might be a bit of a mid and bot lane mismatch in favour of Origen, but if Diamondprox plays well he can probably balance it out.
  • The key question is if Origen was able to get meaningful practice this week, as opposed to the last one.
    • If they are in practice, they’ll score amazingly
    • Running Origen & their members will be a high risk high reward decision for this week

Fnatic vs. H2K

  • H2K seems to play a very rotational style game.
    • Even though they convincingly won both their games in week 1, they didn’t have absurd amounts of points.
  • Fnatic also looks really shaky.
  • I expect H2K to have average-above average points for this game.
    • However, if they sweep the game, Fnatic will do extremely poorly on points.

Fnatic vs. Unicorns of Love

  • Last season, I would run all my Fnatic and UoL members regardless of their other matchups whenever I saw this was going to happen.
    • It just got the most insane points for no reason whatsoever.
  • Fnatic and UoL now have really different lineups, and I find that their playstyles are have yet to be solidified.
  • If you feel like a gamble, this game might explode and possibly win you the week.

 


Graphics by Ling Gu: @SixSonatas

Writing by Kevin ‘SoullessFire’ Lee: Tweet any questions you may have to @SoullessFyr

Special thanks to Chefo

 

Rift-Pulse-Fnatic

With the offseason nearly behind us, 2016 looms ahead, with a completely changed landscape and a slew of unrecognizable teams. We’re back with our final recap of the offseason to kick off the new year and keep you in the loop.

 

North America

 

  • Rick Fox, 3 Time NBA Champion and NBA Analyst, purchased Team Gravity’s LCS spot. The team will compete under newly formed organization Echo Fox.
  • Red Bull has made it’s foray into LCS team sponsorship, announcing official partnerships with with both TSM and Cloud 9.
  • Team Dignitas has parted ways with Brokenshard, and Raz will be stepping in as Head Coach.
  • Team Liquid announced Choi “Locodoco” Yoon-sub as their Head Coach, in addition to a 10 man roster that will be used interchangeably in the 2016 season.
  • Cloud 9 Mid Laner Nicolaj Jensen has changed his name from “Incarnati0n” to Jensen”.
  • TDK Owner Chris Shim, Geon-Woo “Ninja” Noh, & Jin-Yong “Fury” Lee were punished for poaching and breaching contract rules.

 

Europe

 

 

China

 

 

 

Korea

 

 

 

LMS

 

 

 

 

Turkey

 

 

 

 

BR

 

 

 

Events

 

  • IEM Cologne saw Ever take home their second international event win. Infograph.
  • All-Star 2015 has concluded, with Team Fire coming out ahead of Team Ice.

 

 

Season 6 regional start dates

 

DDD

eSPORTS.HMPG_.IEM_COLGNE_11.20.13_thumb

IEM Cologne saw the first time an amateur team took home an IEM title, as well as a ticket to the IEM World Championship. ESC Ever, notorious for taking down 2015 World Champions SK Telecom on their path through the KeSPA cup, edged out one of the LPL’s elite in a 3-2 victory over the Qiao Gu Reapers. We dove into the games and picked out some stats, like KDA and Game time, and how much – or even if – a team benefits from taking Rift Herald, and threw them together to get a better look at what went down in Cologne.

 

IEM Cologne 2015 Infograph

 

Visuals by: Ling Gu

Stats and other information by: Caymus

team_aAa

 

French organization Against All Authority (aAa) announced that they will be making a run at qualifying into the 2016 Challenger Series after recent roster changes.

With the departure of top laner Aymeric ‘Darlik‘ Garçon and jungler Eric ‘Spontexx‘ Peugot, aAa scoured the scene for replacements, eventually deciding on Swedish players Amin ‘Amin‘ Mezher and Olof ‘Flaxxish‘ Medin. In the past, Amin has played for Supa Hot Crew and Ninjas in Pyjamas, and served as a substitue for Team Roccat for the 2015 season.

The team has also added William ‘Galette‘ Lobjois, former manager of training Imaginary Gaming, as their team manager.

aAa plan to debut their roster soon:

 

The first official meeting of the offline team will probably be at the ASUS RoG Tournament to be held in Montpellier on 21 and 22 November (vote for aAa!). Then follow the “marathon ladder” to hope to earn a spot in the qualifying stages of the Challenger Series. Stay tuned!

 

 

Current AaA roster

 

Flag  Olof  “Flaxxish”  Medin – Toplaner

Flag  Amin  “Amin”  Mezher – Jungler

Flag Louis “Polyokov” Hamet -  Midlaner

Flag  Florent  “Yuuki60”  Soler – Carry AD 

Flag  Leo  “Lounet”  Maurice – Support

 

images via aAa


dfdf

Welcome to “Chasing Glory,” a recurring feature where I will discuss the top narratives and key moments from each day of the 2015 League of Legends World Championship. After nearly a year of competition in leagues across the globe, 16 teams have emerged at the top of their respective regions. Now, they travel to Europe where they will battle through the finest international competition for a shot at taking home the Summoner’s Cup  at the Mercedes-Benz Arena in Berlin on October 31st.

Opening day featured plenty of interesting matches from groups A, B, and C of the tournament, with some teams going about business as usual and others stumbling to find ground on the tournament’s newly implemented patch 5.18. I’ll be recapping the matches in order starting with the ever so consistent Fnatic facing off against the hit or miss Invictus Gaming.

Maintaining The Status Quo

Coming off a perfect Season and a 5-2 run to win the split, Fnatic was riding a wave of both confidence and hype heading into this World Championship. Led by veteran support player and 5 time worlds attendee Yellowstar, reunited with Rekkles in the botlane, Fnatic would be among the many Western Teams to bootcamp in Korea in hopes of redeeming their lackluster Season 4 worlds performance, and seeks to continue their dominance into the World Championship.

iG, or Invictus Gaming, is a different story. Known for their inconsistency, the third place LP team comes into this event on a positive note, with a 3-1 upset over serious title contenders EDG in the third place match of the LPL Summer Playoffs and then a perfect 3-0 set against Qiao Gu for the Korean region’s final ticket to Paris.

With the recent changes in patch 5.18, carry style top laners have fallen more into favor than ever, giving a boost to both Zzitai and Huni. Locking in Riven, iG top laner Zzitai looked to snowball his lane early, prompting a Hecarim pick in reply from Huni. Leading the game by a tower and securing First Blood in the top lane, Reignover took advantage of a passive KaKAO and the duo completely negated the impact of Zzitai’s Riven.

Surrendering at 30 minutes after Fnatic ravaged through their base, iG will look to redeem themselves in their day 3 match against Cloud 9. With a rematch against Fnatic looming down the line, iG needs to pick up as many wins as they can to ensure their top 2 placing in the group. As for Fnatic, their pick and ban phase showed that they can adapt on the fly, completely shutting down iG’s composition with their own picks. Reliant on a farming Skarner that never took off iG crumbled to the European kings, and Fnatic and showed us there is something to the hype.

Cool, Calm, And Collected

After squeaking their way into a Worlds qualification with a cinderella run from 7th place to winning the Regional Qualifiers in North America, Cloud 9 was supposed to come in, lose six games, and get out. Facing off against LMS champions AHQ, who took a game from Fnatic at the Mid-Season Invitational and are known for their aggressive early play, the third seeded North American’s fate was all but sealed as Mountain’s Rengar handed First Blood over to Westdoor on Fizz.

Going back to his roots and a champion he was originally known for, Cloud 9 mid laner Nicolaj “Incarnati0n” Jensen headed into his first ever appearance in international play with the recently buffed Veigar. AHQ seemed lost against the tiny master of evil, constantly finding themselves locked up in Veigar’s Event Horizon in teamfights. Stacking his way to over 500 AP at the 22 minute mark, Incarnati0n’s 100% kill participation Veigar thwarted the early aggression of AHQ. Doing what he does best, C9 team captain and newly transitioned Jungler Hai stepped up big time, orchestrating a 23 minute victory in convincing fashion and showing us once again that his shotcalling is nothing less than world class.

Grand Challenge

Aside from the anticipated rematch of Ryu vs. Faker, expectations were low for H2K heading into this game. After SKT picked up a few early kills, H2K kept the game relatively close until a 23 minute fight in the river sent SKT barrelling ahead off the back of a Marin Triple Kill. In control of the map and a 3k gold lead, SKT would go on to close out the game systematically in a 31 minute win over Europe’s second seed.

No Mercy

For the better part of the year, EDG has been cited as one of the top teams in the world, and a contender for the title of World Champions. With the Bangkok Titans coming from one of the weaker competitive regions, it was apparent from the beginning that there was a huge mismatch in skill. Getting three kills in the first four minutes, Deft set the pace of the game with a double kill less than three minutes in. EDG quickly dispatched the Bangkok titans in a surrender at the 20:20 mark, never slowing their pace from the early First Blood.

 

In Doublelift We Trust

Before this match, most would agree that Zionspartan is a cut above his Top Lane counterpart on Flash Wolves, Steak. Despite this, Steak impressed holding his own and having a hand in 100% of his teams kills as CLG’s Zionspartan fell to his fourth death without an answer. With a 7k gold lead and 3 towers over North America’s first seed, the Taiwanese Flash Wolves were poised for victory. Until they overstayed in the bottom lane, netting CLG their first in a series of teamfight wins peppered with Flash Wolves misplays. Clawing their way back on the shoulders of Doublelift’s Jinx, CLG managed to walk away with a win they probably shouldn’t have.

Taking advantage of an enemy’s mistakes is the mark of a superior team, but CLG has a lot to work on if they want get any farther than the group stage, let alone win the tournament. Their next match against Brazil’s PaiN Gaming will be a good indicator of if they can bounce back after a loss and pull off what should be a fairly easy victory.

Wild Style

The Koo Tigers are in a funny spot in terms of how they are perceived. On one hand, they pulled off 1st and 3rd place finishes in one of the toughest regions of play. On the other, the innovation they showed in the first half of the season hasn’t been as apparent. That said, the Koo tigers sport a talented roster backed by solid strategy, especially when playing with a lead.

Viewed as the weakest team in the group, PaiN Gaming enters worlds on a high note, being 15-0 since the CBLoL playoffs. With star Mid Laner Kami at the forefront of their play, the Brazilian squad needs to capture the same macro play they showed in the Wildcard Qualifiers if they want to stay alive in the tournament.

When PaiN managed to slowly pull ahead, Koo’s Gorilla started to pull himself ahead, along with the rest of his team mates. Setting up plays across the map, Gorilla showed why he is often in the conversation of best support player in the world. With their newly found lead, Koo Tigers made quick work of PaiN in a 30 minute finish, playing a very clean second half of the game and showing why they are one of the best teams at worlds once the late game hits.

Day 1 MVP: Hai

 

hai

In choosing the MVP, I looked at a lot of factors. Individual performance, impact on game, role in team, and so forth. While there were definitely cases to be made for the fantastic playmaking of Koo’s Gorilla or the endlessly entertaining Deft Show against the Bangkok Titans. However, as great as those players were, it’s Hai who stood out as the truly most valuable player of the day.

Coming into the tournament as the last seed from North America, Cloud 9 was written out of the event before they left California. With an underperforming top laner, a rookie mid, and a returning player transitioning into a new role, there were a lot of reasons to not think much of the NA squad. Hai quickly silenced any critics with a Lee Sin performance any jungler could be proud of. Putting his signature shotcalling into action, Cloud 9 maneuvered the map, taking objectives as AHQ trailed behind. Hai also put up an impressive display of mechanics, setting up enemies and kicking them to their certain death.

The success of Cloud 9 since Hai’s return can be attributed to a lot of things. Improved shotcalling, a more comfortable mid laner, a better team environment, but above all, there is one constant: Hai.

images via Riot Games/lolesports


Tim Kimbirk is a journalist at TSM. You can find him in the depths of solo queue, or on twitter talking about eSports.

 

SAMSUNG CSC

You guys had a rough split. What were the biggest issues in the team and why did it never fully come together for you?

I would say we had 3 major issues this split. First of all, we started with internet issues and our coach arrived 2nd week in, then we just randomly dropped games versus weaker teams just because random situations would come up and we wouldn’t deal with them properly or like we did in scrims. Finally Forg1ven got banned 2 weeks before the end of the split. I feel like if we dealt properly with those issues we would have at least been in playoffs, and in the shape we were towards the end of the split maybe got a spot to worlds.

 

Looking back, who gave you the hardest time in lane? Have you noticed any weird quirks in any of the top laners?

Hmm I think Reignover plays really well around Huni, so he’s the one that gave me the hardest time in lane probably. And sorry I’ve to keep my secrets on how to beat other toplaners!

 

Who do you feel is the strongest top in Europe?

I would say there is a clear top 3 between Huni, sOAZ and me, with Odoamne being 4th in Europe. I would like to say I’m the best, but you could argue Huni played better last split. I’ll just have to show even more next split. Like a great philosopher once said : “You can either be the best or suck a ****.”

 

With a clean 3-0, how did you feel coming into the promotion series?

We were really confident going into the series. It was really smooth playing with Kris again and we watched how mouz played and prepared properly. I actually feel like if we could have played the last weeks and then playoffs with Forg1ven we would have gone to worlds.

 

What is the team dynamic like in game? How is shotcalling assigned and who is the most vocal?

This split, with the arrival of Shaunz, Diamond had to become the shotcaller of the team and needed to know what to do in a situation given. Things like when to duo roam with Edward and when to control Baron Nashor with 5 pinks, when to give up drake and what to take in exchange for example.

Obviously the other 4 members were giving information, and depending on who’s fed between Forg1ven, Betsy and I, we could adjust the plan during the game.

Let’s say Forg1ven get 5 kills in early, he could just call to split push or 1-3-1 and Diamond would adapt.

 

Why is it that Gambit decided to choose mousesports as their opponent In the promotion tournament?

I dont really think it would have mattered but personaly I just can’t be arsed to play versus Udyr, Twisted Fate or Shaco ;).

 

Expectations of the top lane meta for the World Championship?

Hmm unless there are some big nerfs on 5.18 the hot picks will probably be something around the lines of Darius, Fiora, Gangplank, Olaf, Shen, Ryze with the usual Gnar and lovely Riven/Fizz/Yasuo (for good players only ;).

 

How would you rate the reworked Darius, Fiora, and Garen? Do you think they will see play in competitive games?

The reworked champions are all broken I think, whether it’s Skarner, Mordekaiser, Darius, Garen or Fiora, they all are really good, and few people found ways to counter them yet I believe. Worlds is some time away however so they may fall of. As of right now they would be surely all played in competitive I feel, maybe Garen a bit less than the others.

 

Which teams are you most expecting to perform well at the World Championship? How strong is Europe comparatively and what are their chances?

I think the 3 favorites going into Worlds right now are probably LDG, SKT and EDG.

Not sure about OG and H2K given their groups, but I really do think FNC will perform well and hopefully keep the trophy in Europe.

 

Who do you think are the strongest top laners from other regions?

I really like watching Duke, Smeb and Ssumday.

In NA ZionSpartan is really above the rest. I haven’t been watching enough LPL to properly tell who’s the best there, gonna have a better opinion after Worlds.

 

What are your plans for the offseason? Will you have vacation? Will you continue training?

Right now I’m just spending some time with my family and my friends while trying to setup my stream. I’m still playing soloqueue, and while I’m not I plan to go on getting vacation. I’ll be going to almost every single stage of Worlds, viva Europa!

 

Shoutouts?

Well first of all thanks Tim for the interview, thanks to everyone that believes in me. I’m really confident season 6 will be my time to shine !

 

 

image via azubu


Tim Kimbirk is a content creator and interviewer for SoloMid. You can find him getting caught out in the depths of solo queue, or on twitter talking about eSports.

 

Rift Pulse August 15

 

Rift pulse returns with the latest standings and news from around the scene. In the LCS, Fnatic closed out the first ever perfect season in the LCS as Team Liquid surged to a first place finish. With teams from around the world clashing in their regions playoffs, the road to the 2015 World Championship is underway.

 

North America

 

  • Team Impulse issued a statement on the suspension of Mid Laner XiaoweiXiao.
  • Dignitas Head Coach Sami ‘Rico‘ Harbi has returned to LA and will take back the reigns as Head Coach.
  • David ‘Yusui’ bloomquist has announced his retirement.
  • TSM Online Analyst Dylan Falco has left the team.
  • Riot has ruled that Yu ‘XiaoWeiXiao‘ Xian  is suspended until spring 2016.
  • Nicolas ‘Gleeb‘ Haddad has announced his retirement from competitive play.
  • Team 8 has chosen to play against Team Imagine in the upcoming Spring Promotion tournament.

 

 

NA LCS 2015 Summer Playoff Schedule

 


naplayoffs

 

 

Europe

 

 

 

EU LCS 2015 Summer Playoff Schedule

 

euplayoffs

 

 

 

China

 

 

 

LPL 2015 Summer Playoff Schedule

 


lplplayoffs

 

 

 

Korea

 

LCK

 

 

LCK Final

 

 

 

 

 

LCK 2015 Summer Playoff Schedule

 

Korea Playoffs

 

 

 

Brazil

 

  • Hugo ‘Dioud‘ Padioleau has been granted legal status as a “Professional eSports player” by the Brazilian Government.
  • The CBLOL 2015 Summer Season has ended, with paiN Gaming taking down INTZ e-sports 3-0 to qualify for the 2015 International Wildcard Tournament.

 

CBLOL 2015 Summer Season Finals Results

pain

 

 

 

OCE

 

  • OPL Finals concluded August 8th, with Chiefs eSports Club taking the title and the ticket to the 2015 International Wildcard Tournament.
  • Riot has made their ruling on Curtis “Flying Joo” Schembri relating to toxic behavior.

 

OCE

 

 

SEA

 

  • LMS playoffs have concluded, with AHQ emerging as champions.
  • LMS Regional Finals will conclude August 15th. Post will be updated accordingly.

 

LMS

 

LMS Playoffs

 

 

 

 

 

Challenger Series

 

  • Team Dignitas EU qualify to the 2016 LCS Spring Split
  • Renegades qualify to the 2016 LCS Spring Split

 

 

EU

 

EUCS

 

 

NA

 

NACS

 

images via lolesports. Banner via Chefo.

11892039_970032026394820_6018403282365797645_n

In the latest step forward for government recognition of eSports, paiN Gaming Support player Hugo ‘Dioud’ Padioleau took to Facebook to announce that he was granted legal status as a Professional eSports player by the Brazilian Government.

From Dioud’s Facebook:

 

These 2 last days were very important for me. Indeed, it’s now official and approved by the Brazilian Government:

I’m the first foreigner to have a legal status as “Pro Esport Player”

 

Read the post in it’s entirety.

 

image via Dioud official Facebook