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Posts Tagged ‘esports’

 

Sitting proudly at the top of the standings, H2K is hard at work as the playoffs loom just over a month away. After narrowly losing to Vitality and a clean victory against Origen in week 6, I spoke with support player Vander on the split so far, looking ahead, and playing through temporary roster trouble.

You recently finished playing against UoL, G2, Vitality, and Origen, and will face off against Fnatic this week. Having completed the perceived “harder” part of your schedule with most of the current top teams out of the way, is there as much focus on the season or is the team already looking towards playoffs?

 

It is still very important to us to win every consecutive game. Our main goal now is to secure top two in the split. It gives us a free BYE to the semifinals, which is very helpful, especially if we want to win the whole split. Also we will be able to book our flights to Rotterdam a bit earlier and save some money.

 

You came up just short of a win against Vitality in a 60 minute game in week 6. What led to the game lasting as long as it did and what contributed most to the loss? What is your mindset in a game that plays out that long?

We played bad early game; after Graves TP top we had 3 losing lanes. On the other hand we had a better team-fighting composition, so the enemy team was scared to push our towers and we couldn’t really step out any further. It was a long stall until the fifth drake buff. At this point we had to stop farming and try to regain control of the map by catching targets with our ultimates. Sadly we failed the last and crucial fight and Vitality won the game.

 

You play a big part of your teams vision game, especially early on. Is there a specific emphasis on vision for you is it just in the nature of the role? What is your ideal way of playing the early game as a support?

My goal every game is to have lane control, which lets me to push out or move faster than enemy support to any skirmish on the map. If you can do it, warding becomes easier. I am also scared that Forgiven will get mad if we lose lane. Both me and Jankos try to cooperate a lot to setup good vision for our laners.

 

How is shotcalling handled in game and what is the team environment like on a typical day?

I think in the first few weeks Ryu was the main shotcaller, but when we lost him other people had to take on the responsibility. Right now it’s much more divided – the worst thing is when the game is really long and one mistake costs you the game – people become scared to make the aggressive call. I think we have good time with each other, everyone plays as much as possible, we definitely aim to win the split.

 

You have a lot of synergy with Jankos, who came with you to the team from Roccat. How strong is your bond inside and outside of the game? What makes you such a strong duo in your opinion?

I can definitely say that we are good friends and we really trust each other – both inside and outside of the game. I think we are A good duo, because we like to fight a lot and gain control of the game together. We lived through so many meta changes together, it allows us to understand what to do quickly. We are experienced players at this point.

 

How are you enjoying playing with Forg1ven so far and what bot lanes do you think stack up to you? Are you the strongest bot lane in EU? Which teams are the hardest to lane against?

I think we are a really good lane. Forgiven gets a lot of advantages by himself, so my main job is to make him safe and peel off the enemy support most of the time. It makes my life pretty easy. I wouldn’t say any lane is hard to play against. We have our own playstyle that just works most of the time. I think our main weakness that we do not play some champions that are currently really strong.

 

Due to visa issues, you played for several weeks without Ryu. How did the team operate with Selfie in his absence and what was the most noticeable difference between the two?

Selfie is way less experienced than Ryu. He often played way too aggressive and got caught in early game. It made games very different for us, because Ryu is probably the best at understanding the pressure game in our team. Mechanically they are very close, so it was all about knowledge and losing the backbone of our team.

 

Who is the strongest team in the LCS?

Hard to say right now, I think us and Vitality are the strongest. I am confident we will be better than them by playoffs. I am also a bit scared Origen will catch up and become really dangerous again, their players are both very experienced and skilled – if they tryhard.

 

Looking ahead, do you think G2 will continue to remain at the top of the standings? Who do you see in the finals of the playoffs and representing Europe at the Mid Season Invitational?

In my opinion G2 is the most likely team to drop off from the current top three. It is my 3rd season already and I have never played in the final. Our players are really good and smart, if everyone puts their 110% effort I am sure we can go to MSI.

 

You took down Origen pretty handedly, and they are currently struggling, especially when compared to their performance last year. Do you expect to see them back on top by the end of the season? Are other teams getting that much stronger or is it just growing pains?

This split a lot of powerful teams formed. Last year when I was on Team ROCCAT we almost took them down in the qualifiers to Worlds. They were a really good team, but not invincible. I think right now their biggest problem is their personal performance. Every game someone from Origen makes a huge mistake, which turns into a big lead or easy snowball for enemy team.

 

How are you enjoying the current meta so far and what is your favorite support champion?

I don’t really care about the meta; I always try to adapt and have my own opinion on strong champions and team comps. I try to follow everyone and see what they are doing, but blindly copying them is not the right way to go. I really like to play Alistar, he is very versatile champion.

 

Shoutouts?

I want to thank my team and coach for trying their best to improve each day. Big shoutout to H2k and people behind this organisation. And the most important ones – our fans.

 

 

photo credit: lolesports


Caymus is an esports journalist and content creator. You can find him getting caught out in the depths of solo queue, or on twitter talking about Esports.

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Putting up impressive numbers in the first few weeks of the 2016 season, I caught up with Unicorns of Love AD Carry Pierre “Steelback” Mejaldi to talk about his return to Europe, playing on a new team, the current meta, and more.

 

Q: You spent some time playing in North America on Team Imagine before joining Unicorns of Love. Did you enjoy your time there? Do you prefer playing in Europe?

Yes I enjoyed playing there. It was something totally new and a different mindset than EU players. I felt happy when I was in NA because I met really nice people and it gave me the opportunity to grow as a player.

 

Q: What was your mindset like heading into the season? Was there any difficulty in adjusting to a new team?

My mindset was to perform to my own expectations. I knew that I improved a lot but I didn’t want to fail to adapt properly on stage. There wasn’t really any difficulty because everyone is really experienced which make things way easier.

 

Q: What is it like playing with Hylissang and what is the biggest difference between him and BIG/Baby or Yellowstar?

Well the biggest difference is in the laning phase aggression. Hylissang is very aggressive in lane which I like. Baby was kind of the same too. Yellowstar was more control and roamed way more which was also good, it’s just two different playstyles.

 

Q: What type of role do you feel fits you best and do you feel it meshes well with the team?

I feel that I can play way more aggressive in this team and play more how I feel.  I felt that I wasn’t playing my own playstyle before, and I really didn’t like playing passively so now I’m quite happy that I can just play natural and that everyone has the possibility to be a carry.

 

Q: What is the team environment like? What is communication like in game and how is shotcalling handled?

The team environment is pretty good. Everyone is willing to improve and plays the game a lot. We talk way more than my previous team and I think it’s really nice. You always needs to say what’s on your mind with shotcalling, and everyone is doing it pretty much which I think is the best cause everyone should be able to understand what would be the best move possible at what time.

 

Q: You played week with Djoko due to visa issues with Diamondprox. How much has this affected the team? What is the most noticeable difference in his absence?

Djoko played better than everyone expected, I’m sure he had confidence on stage to make plays. The absence of Diamondprox affected us obviously because he was a top tier jungler and had a lot of experience, he was helping the shotcalling a lot. I’d say the most noticeable difference is the experience and the knowledge that he has with every match up which is really huge.

 

Q: Last year, you said you wanted to see more Ezreal in the LCS. In 2016, he rounds out the top 10 most played champions in the EU LCS. Do you still enjoy playing him?

Yes I really enjoy Ezreal even though his laning phase is not the best at the moment due to his tear build. I still like him because you’re able to poke and make plays with him.

 

What in your eyes makes him so strong?

I feel his strongest point is his poke and his ability to peel for yourself and I think that people forget a lot about how to use his ult efficiently. For example clearing waves and harassing the enemy.

 

Q: How would you rate your performance so far? Who do you feel is the biggest competition among AD Carries in EU?

I’m happy that people noticed that I improved but I still think that I can do way more. People shouldn’t forget that my team is really good, which is a huge reason why I’ve looked good at the beginning of the season. I think there are a lot of good AD carries that I can learn from and we will see how it goes during the season.

 

Q: Of the teams you’ve played, who was most difficult to play against?

Well I think Fnatic was the most difficult cause they managed to stall the game for super long even though they were really behind. I feel that we lost to G2 and Origen because mostly because of draft.

 

Q: How do you feel about the state of the current meta? Specifically AD Carries? Are there any changes you’d like to see in the game?

I feel that the current meta is pretty good because it’s more about aggressive plays all over the map and there are way less tanks. Also, on AD carries you can build differently depending on which ADC you pick. Same for masteries, before there was one only way to take masteries and build AD carries.

 

Q: Shoutouts?

I just want to thank every fan that support us. It helps a lot, you guys are awesome keep it up!

 

 

photo credit: lolesports


Caymus is a journalist and content creator for SoloMid. You can find him getting caught out in the depths of solo queue, or on twitter talking about Esports.

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Top scorers points earned for week 1

  1. Shiphtur – Dignitas: 60.27 points
  2. Piglet – Liquid: 58.89 points
  3. Freeze – Renegades: 48.31 points
  4. WildTurtle – Immortals: 48.29 points
  5. Fenix – Liquid: 47.84 points
  6. Trick – G2: 47.09 points
  7. Kiwikid – Dignitas: 45.69 points
  8. Altec – NRG: 45.65 points
  9. FORG1VENGRE – H2K: 45.45 points
  10. Stixxay – CLG: 44.17 points

 

First impressions from Week 1

  • Immortals look amazing. I’m happy to give especially Reignover and Turtle higher priority. I get the feeling Fnatic’s early game shotcalling last season was heavily directed by Reignover, although I can’t prove it, but that usually means a lot of fights. Turtle’s back to his aggresive self too so he’ll be awesome.
  • We have yet to see Dignitas fight upper tier teams (NRG had subs, so it didn’t count), but their point gain versus middle pack teams is amazing. Pay attention to their matchups, and Shiphtur may very well get you 50+ points in a week.
  • NRG’s question marks to me at the moment are KonKwon and Moon. Their other players look great though. They did very well this week, but it would be great to see how much Moon influences the tide of their games.
  • CLG is looking alright. Heavy rotations still in play, but lots of diving and teamfighting as well. I still have questions about Huhi, but I think Stixxay deserves a spot on the map.
  • Liquid‘s members are looking to be very good fantasy point generators, even though they’re 0-2. I don’t know if I should include Matt on the list yet, however, and the whole sub squad thing does not help their case. Be careful about running them, because if they’re subbed out midweek you’re in trouble.
  • TSM and Origen I think had off weeks… I’d have to see their week 2 play to decisively lower any of their positions, since apparently neither team had much practice coming into this week. Also Doublelift randomly got high points, so he’s working that + status well.
  • Renegades seem to have a pretty rotation heavy style (ode to MonteCristo I suppose). Their teamfighting seems alright though, so I’m happy to give small boosts to some of their members.
  • Consider fielding players who get to play against TiP. TiP is looking very weak, and that’s exploitable.
  • UoL looks pretty good. Diamond and Viziscasci have decent synergy, and their new bot lane have been performing acceptably. They’ll put up a good fight regardless of their opponent, so I expect good things to come from them. However, I’m still not convinced about the nature of their aggression. Their points seem to be above average, so I’m keeping an eye on them.
  • I’m still unsure about Echo Fox, Fnatic, G2, and Roccat. Fnatic moreso because they had one decent game against an out-of-form Origen, and because they had one terrible game against Vitality.
  • H2K is looking fantastic as well, but they seemed to play more rotationally as opposed to aggressively. I feel like they’ll get consistently high points, but absurd maximums will be rare.
  • Vitality’s performance looks to be about whether or not Shook wakes up right that day. I’ve lowered Kasing and Hjarnan temporarily for now, but there’s a good chance I might bump them back up again.
  • Elements, Giants, and Splyce did not impress me at all last week.

Based on these impressions, I have slightly adjusted the Drafting Priority for Week 2. Notice the tonne of new additions. Below the list, I’ve done a small run down for notable Week 2 matches that might be worth setting up your roster for.


 

W2-Recommended-Picks

 

Notable Week 2 Matches

Average points per game ~= 20 per player. The games I note are ones I expect to be higher than average or lower than average in certain ways. If I don’t note something, it’s because I either don’t think it’s worth mentioning, or I think it’ll give average points.

Team Impulse vs. Cloud9

  • Probably a convincing C9 win. Rush, Sneaky, and Jensen expected to do exceedingly well here.

TSM vs. Immortals

  • Slanted in favour of Immortals, probably 65-35 odds from TSM’s poor showing this week.
  • TSM looks to be good at putting up fights, so they (Doublelift and Bjergsen especially) should be able to net decent scores.
  • IMT has a very aggressive style that has been successful so far. Unless TSM has found a way to completely shut them out, they should score quite well too.

Liquid vs. Counter Logic Gaming

  • Probably a bloodbath.
  • Liquid has a good record vs CLG in season games.
  • Pay attention to which players Liquid fields.
    • If Piglet, Dardoch, and Fenix are in, I think they’re bound to get lots of points.
  • Also, if Liquid beats CLG like they have in the past, expect it to be a stomp (low CLG points).

NRG vs. Immortals

  • I expect a lot of kills to go both ways in this matchup.
    • Impact vs Huni, Pob vs GBM, Turtle vs Altec are all going to be crazy.
  • The question mark here will be Moon, and his performance will determine which way the points slant.
    • If he does well, NRG and Immortals should go even on points, but if he does poorly, Reignover’s going to take over.

Counter Logic Gaming vs. Cloud9

  • If C9 run hai, expect a lot of rotations, and an average to above average game for points.
  • This shouldn’t be a stalled out game. I expect a lot of proactive diving and skirmishing.
  • Whichever team wins this game will likely have a tonne of points from objectives.

Giants vs. G2 Esports

  • If both teams have the same showing at last week, I expect Trick, Emperor, and Perkz to have nutty points from this game.

Origen vs. Unicorns of Love

  • This game will probably have quite a bit of action going on, so I think points should be higher than average.
  • There might be a bit of a mid and bot lane mismatch in favour of Origen, but if Diamondprox plays well he can probably balance it out.
  • The key question is if Origen was able to get meaningful practice this week, as opposed to the last one.
    • If they are in practice, they’ll score amazingly
    • Running Origen & their members will be a high risk high reward decision for this week

Fnatic vs. H2K

  • H2K seems to play a very rotational style game.
    • Even though they convincingly won both their games in week 1, they didn’t have absurd amounts of points.
  • Fnatic also looks really shaky.
  • I expect H2K to have average-above average points for this game.
    • However, if they sweep the game, Fnatic will do extremely poorly on points.

Fnatic vs. Unicorns of Love

  • Last season, I would run all my Fnatic and UoL members regardless of their other matchups whenever I saw this was going to happen.
    • It just got the most insane points for no reason whatsoever.
  • Fnatic and UoL now have really different lineups, and I find that their playstyles are have yet to be solidified.
  • If you feel like a gamble, this game might explode and possibly win you the week.

 


Graphics by Ling Gu: @SixSonatas

Writing by Kevin ‘SoullessFire’ Lee: Tweet any questions you may have to @SoullessFyr

Special thanks to Chefo

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The 2016 season has arrived. With one of the most tumultuous offseasons we’ve seen so far behind us, it’s only fitting that we kick off the Spring Split with the most storied rivalry in the region: Team SoloMid vs. Counter Logic Gaming. While CLG holds the edge in more recent history, a matchup between these two teams almost never disappoints. Let’s see how the first day of competition played out for the reshaped North America.

 

TSM CLG

 

TSM vs. CLG: Finding Ground

 

In the first and most anticipated game of the day, CLG showcased the power of coordination with superior objective control and map play, especially in the early game. With a failed lane swap from TSM to start the match, CLG managed to jump ahead and stayed in the drivers seat, secured by a baron around the 23 minute mark which would set the pace for the rest of the game. In staggered moves around the Dragon and Baron, CLG would eventually close the game out  after 44 minutes, five Dragons, and an impressive debut from CLG’s newest addition Trevor “Stixxay” Hayes. Participating in 19 of CLG’s 22 kills, the recently recruited AD Carry came into this game with some big shoes to fill, replacing his lane counter and longtime CLG AD Carry Yiliang “Doublelift” Peng. CLG looks to a much easier game 2 against the 0-1 Team Dignitas, and Team SoloMid hopes to recover for an even week in a vital game against Team Liquid.

 

IMT

 

Cloud9 vs. Immortals: Reignover Me

 

Living up to the preseason hype, Immortals delivered a clean performance against Cloud 9, with Jungler Kim “Reignover” Yeu-jin putting the team ahead from the beginning and never letting go. Though the first outer tower would fall rather late at 16 minutes and 50 seconds into the game, once it was down, Immortals continued pressing into C9 and methodically closed the game out at the 27 minute mark. With a creative Cho’Gath pick from the teams coaching staff and Heo “Huni” Seung-hoon, the top laner was able to shut down the Cloud 9 carries and deliver kill after kill onto AD Carry Jason “WildTurtle” Tran. WildTurtle put up 11  kills and 4 assists in his season opener, closing the game with a quadra kill and silencing the critics that he was past his prime or less than ideal for the newly minted Immortals team. While Immortals look to be a contender for a top spot in the league, Cloud9 once again looked to be in disarray without shotcaller Hai “Hai” Du Lam, who is looking to transition out of the starting position for the team as support player Michael “Bunny FuFuu” Kurylo steps into the role.

 

NRG

 

Team Dignitas vs. NRG: The Color Purple

 

In the third matchup of the day, we saw a handicapped NRG using substitutes Cristian “Cris” Rosales and Lee “Shrimp” dispatch of Team Dignitas after falling behind to a mid lane push after an early gank  onto Lee “GBM” Chang-seok. Marked by an impressive opening performance culimating in two baron steals by the former Jin Air mid laner, a back and forth battle between the two teams would eventually find NRG coming out with a 40 minute win. Despite a strong performance from mid laner Danny “Shiphtur” Le with an 8 kill Anivia, Team Dignitas was lacking in synergy and never quite managed to execute despite an early lead. Performing solidly, NRG is in decent shape heading into their match against the Renegades. Dignitas on the other hand has a lot of work to do if they expect to put up a fight against the very-in-sync CLG.

 

REN

 

LA Renegades vs. Team Liquid: Ice Ice Baby

 

Patch 6.1 may be regarded for having faster games, but that didn’t stop the Renegades from taking a full hour before closing this one out in an important victory over Team Liquid. Qualifying into the Spring Split by winning the Challenger Series last season, the Renegades showcased the advantages of team synergy starting the game off with advantages coming from both the top and bottom lanes. AleÅ¡ “Freeze” Kněžínek and Maria “Remi” Creveling proved to be a force in the bot lane, with a huge 11-2-7 score and 100% kill participation from Freeze. Playing around the initiation of Remilia’s Alistar and Freeze’s Kalista, Renegades made good use of strong teamfighting assisted by the tankiness of Mundo and Alistar and shielding power of Alex Ich’s Orianna. In the final fight of the game, Team Captain Alberto “Crumbzz” Rengifo managed to steal the Baron and finally close out the game. Team Liquid will utilize it’s 10 man roster with substitutions in the support and jungle positions in their match against TSM. Renegades should look to continue playing around their bottom lane and using their superior team play to gain advantages in their game against NRG.

 

EF

 

Echo Fox vs. Team Impulse: Old and New

 

Before this match started, there was an air of caution around the recently formed Echo Fox squad as it has several unproven and otherwise unheard of players. With star player Henrik “Froggen” Hansen at the center of the team and AD Carry Yuri “KEITH” Jew finally getting his chance at a starting role, it was up to Froggen’s veteran leadership to bring this squad of mixed experience together. With a 37 minute victory over Team Impulse and a stellar 7-0-5 performance from Keith, Echo Fox looked promising in their LCS debut. Team Impulse however is a team playing with substitutes and Support Austin “Gate” Yu in the mid lane for the first time in months, so I wouldn’t put too much stock into this match. The first litmus test for Echo Fox will be against Cloud 9, who will be out for blood after a one sided loss to Immortals. Speaking of the Immortals, they should have no problem handling Team Impulse when they meet in their second game.

 

 

 

photo(s) credit: lolesports


Caymus is a journalist and content creator for SoloMid. You can find him getting caught out in the depths of solo queue, or on twitter talking about Esports.

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Fantasy LCS isn’t about picking up the best players historically. For example, a good player last season who didn’t get top tier fantasy points is Froggen. Consider that Elements was in shambles, and though he’s still arguably a top mid laner in EU, it was hard to consistently perform for him. Fantasy LCS is about being able to pick players that are able to consistently achieve a high amount of kills, assists, and multi-kills.

 


Explanation:

Quality 1

As mentioned above, all that matters in Fantasy LCS is high kills and assists. You want extremely aggressive players who will always try to get kills instead of farming safely. Having a high number of deaths is not a detriment as long as the player is getting kills. This is pretty simple math:

  • A player who trades a kill for a death nets 1.5 points.
  • A player who dies but gets an assist nets 1 point

Trading for an assist is already the same as getting 100 CS. A passive player who aims to only farm is going to lose out big time on fantasy points. Farm should be seen as a bonus extra 3-6 points.

Quality 2

Multi-kills play a large factor in getting bonus points. In my experience, you should aim for about 20-30 points per player per game on your fantasy team. If a player gets on average 25 points a game, you’d get 50 points in a week per player, leading to an average of 300 points, which is very difficult to beat.

  • Pentas mean a bonus 10 points, Quadras 5, Triples 2
  • This is on top of the kill points. So technically, a Penta is worth 17.5 points, Quadras 16, Triples 6.5

If a player gets a pentakill, already get near the 20 point floor you’re aiming for. This is key, and how players like Niels or Doublelift can get 40-50 points in a single game. Of course, a player won’t be getting pentakills every game, but players who consistently mop up team fights are more likely to get these bonuses (mostly AD Carries and Mid Laners)

Quality 3

Think about a fantasy team player as a car. Having a fantasy player that are incarnations of qualities 1 and 2 is like having a pretty shiny lamborghini. However, that lambo is only going to go as far as it has fuel for. The fuel in this analogy is going to be their team, and how well it works together. Case in point: Froggen/Forgiven last split.

A top fantasy team is one with excellent teamfighting and macro play. These usually lead to wins, and the math is pretty self-explanatory.

With that being said, here’s my top picks for fantasy. The players were divided based off how well their prior performances (stats from previous Fantasy LCS splits) fit the aforementioned criteria:

 

Recommended-Picks

 

Two Notes:

  •  Be wary of slumps. A fantasy team that does well on week 1 will not necessarily do well all split.
  • Try to draft a fantasy team where you are able to substitute players out in order to avoid your team playing against each other (in the worst case, the game is a shut out, and one of your players gets like no points)

 

Disclaimer: I am not personally responsible for whatever happens if you follow this guide. 


 

Graphics by Ling Gu: @SixSonatas

Writing by Kevin ‘SoullessFire’ Lee: @SoullessFyr

 

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With the offseason nearly behind us, 2016 looms ahead, with a completely changed landscape and a slew of unrecognizable teams. We’re back with our final recap of the offseason to kick off the new year and keep you in the loop.

 

North America

 

  • Rick Fox, 3 Time NBA Champion and NBA Analyst, purchased Team Gravity’s LCS spot. The team will compete under newly formed organization Echo Fox.
  • Red Bull has made it’s foray into LCS team sponsorship, announcing official partnerships with with both TSM and Cloud 9.
  • Team Dignitas has parted ways with Brokenshard, and Raz will be stepping in as Head Coach.
  • Team Liquid announced Choi “Locodoco” Yoon-sub as their Head Coach, in addition to a 10 man roster that will be used interchangeably in the 2016 season.
  • Cloud 9 Mid Laner Nicolaj Jensen has changed his name from “Incarnati0n” to Jensen”.
  • TDK Owner Chris Shim, Geon-Woo “Ninja” Noh, & Jin-Yong “Fury” Lee were punished for poaching and breaching contract rules.

 

Europe

 

 

China

 

 

 

Korea

 

 

 

LMS

 

 

 

 

Turkey

 

 

 

 

BR

 

 

 

Events

 

  • IEM Cologne saw Ever take home their second international event win. Infograph.
  • All-Star 2015 has concluded, with Team Fire coming out ahead of Team Ice.

 

 

Season 6 regional start dates

 

DDD

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In December, multigaming organization Natus Vincere, or Na’vi, made their official return to the competitive League of Legends scene with the announcement of their challenger roster, and their intent to climb their way through the Challenger Series into the LCS. NoL spoke with their starting Jungler, Amin “Amin” Mezher, on playing in the Challenger Series, the development of the amateur scene, how he ended up on Na’Vi, and more.

You’ve spent quite some time in the Challenger series. What has kept you motivated to continue playing? Has there ever been a time you considered giving up?

I just enjoy playing the game in an amateur scene where I can have a real life and also some competitive gaming. Giving up? No. I could have played in the LCS if I wanted to, I had offers.

 

What are your thoughts on the development of the Challenger scene over the past year and where is it still lacking the most? What needs to change to make being an amateur player more viable?

I think the challenger series has improved a lot since I played in it with NiP. It’s a lot more structured now, with better money.

 

With so many teams receiving backing, both new and old alike, are you concerned with organizations who have a higher spending power potentially limiting the growth of upstarts and those with less money?

With so many new organizations coming in, with an entire bank in the pocket it definitely makes it harder for Solo queue players to get into the scene. Why would you tryout a random solo queue player when you can just buy one of the best players in that role?

 

You sometimes get a bad rep for your attitude. Do you think it is deserved and are you doing anything to change this perception?

I would say it’s deserved, but a bit exaggerated by the community, reddit etc. I think I was way more toxic back in the day when I was a lot younger. Now I’m trying to be more mature and I think I’m on the road to incarnation.

 

How did you end up on Na’Vi? What led to your decision in joining the team? What was the trial process like?

I wanted to join an amateur team this year and I heard Na’Vi was looking for players so yeah, the org is very big in esports and it made my decision easier. I saw that they took it very serious with the staff etc. which was important. To be honest I just scrimmed two games and after that it was a done deal pretty much.

 

What are your immediate goals now that you are officially competing again?

My first goal is to qualify for CS and play good every game and prove myself a bit more to the community.

 

Does Na’Vi have a gaming house, or plans to get one?

I do believe Na’Vi are going to buy a gaming house soon in Berlin, so yes.

 

Are you already practicing as a team? Results?

We haven’t played a lot of tournaments or barely any official games, but we’re practicing. Results are pretty good since we’re a new team.

 

How confident are you that this team will perform in Challenger Series and potentially make the LCS? Is there an expectation to qualify by the organization?

I believe if we stick together and if everyone takes it serious, we can go a long way, including in the LCS. Na’Vi believes in us.

 

What is the team atmosphere like? Is it strictly business, or do you guys do things together outside of the game as well?

I like the team atmosphere because it’s not strictly business, we’re friends too. So after scrims we can just keep hanging out.

 

How is shot calling handled in-game?

We’re still a new team so we’re trying stuff out pretty much but it’s mostly me, mid, and top shot calling.

 

How are you enjoying the preseason? What do you hope to see changed before competition starts?

I like the preseason, I like the fact that more aggressive junglers are played. It fits me.

 

Who do you see as the biggest threats in Challenger right now? Who are you most looking forward to play against?

I would say Millenium are one of the best challenger teams right now. They’ve played together for a long time and have great teamwork.

 

Shoutouts?

Just a big shoutout to Na`Vi and all the sponsors


 

Caymus is a journalist and content creator for SoloMid. You can find him getting caught out in the depths of solo queue, or on twitter talking about eSports.

 
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In the premiere edition of Sessions, Noah Whinston talks about his transition into eSports, acquiring investor interest, player treatment, and more.


Immortals-Interview-Noah-Whinston

 

Editors Note: Clinton Foy is the managing director of venture capital firm CrossCut Ventures.


Caymus is a content creator and journalist for SoloMid. You can find him getting caught out in the depths of solo queue, or on twitter talking about eSports.

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With Cloud 9 deciding to devote their time to preparation for IEM Cologne on December 16th,  Cloud 9  players Hai ‘Hai‘ Du Lam and Lee ‘Rush‘ Yoon-jae will be unable to attend the 2015 All-Star Event. Normally, Rush would have taken the place of Hai, who is now supporting for Cloud 9 after switching to jungle in the 2015 Summer Split. However, since both players are now on the same team and competing together at IEM, the spot goes to the 3rd place nominee. Receiving the third highest votes behind his fellow teammates, William ‘Meteos‘ Hartman will represent North America in the jungle at the ASE on December 10th.

Cloud 9 released a press statement explaining their reasoning behind the decision and addressed the perceived non overlap of dates between events:

 

Soon after the All-Star Event poll results began flooding in, it was clear that things were about to get complicated. While we were thrilled to see our players once again being recognized by fans, we were faced with a serious quandary: Is attending the ASE a viable option?

The short answer is yes. The dates of the ASE (Dec 10-13) do not directly interrupt our attendance and participation for IEM Cologne (Dec 16-21).

The long answer is no.  Unfortunately, the time commitment required for either Hai or Rush to attend the ASE is simply too disruptive to the teams preparation for IEM Cologne as the ASE runs for four days of public play and also includes extra preparation time off-stream. As the 3rd place vote receiver in the Jungle role, William “Meteos” Hartman has agreed to represent the North American LCS for the entirety of the event.

 

The 2015 All-Star Event takes place from December 10-13th in Los Angeles, California.

 

 

 

image credit: Cloud 9

NaJin_2015_Spring

 

Najin e-mFire has announced that Mid laners Yu ‘Ggoong‘ Byeong-jun and Park ‘TANK‘ Dan-won, AD Carry Oh ‘Ohq‘ Gyu-min, jungler Cho ‘Watch‘ Jae-geol,  supports Kim ‘Pure‘ Jin-sun and Jang ‘Cain‘ Nu-ri, and head coach Park ‘Reach‘ Jung-suk have all decided to part ways with the organization, terminating their contracts on November 30th.

 

 

With the players exit, Lee “Duke” Ho-seong and Yoon “Peanut” Wang-ho, are the only remaining members of the team. Najin has yet to confirm whether Duke and Peanut have re-signed their contracts. It also remains a mystery as to where the departed players and coach Reach will go next.

 

NoL will continue to provide updates as we learn more about the changes overseas.

 

 

 

image credit: OGN