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Posts Tagged ‘Riot games’

 

Riot Games has just announced that they will be hosting a Six team international competition in Tallahassee, Florida, on May 7-10, 2015.

Taken from the official post:

Five participating teams are chosen by winning their split playoffs in the EU LCS, LCK, LMS, LPL, and NA LCS. The sixth and final spot will go to the winner of the International Wild Card Invitational (IWCI), another new event to be held in Istanbul, Turkey, in late April.

Top talent from around the globe will compete in a single round-robin Group Stage on May 7-8. The top four teams from the Group Stage will advance to Best of 5s bracket stage on May 9-10 for a chance to be crowned the winner.

The four days of League of Legends action will take place in Tallahassee, Florida, at the Donald L. Tucker Civic Center located at Florida State University.

 

 

Official Riot Announcement

Seven months ago, it was mentioned that a new Patcher & Landing Page would be rolled out as the foundation for future updates to the game client in an effort to overhaul both the visual appearance and the underlying technology of the current client.

 

lppbe

 

Today, Koen Hendrix aka Riot Boompje confirmed on twitter that CrossPvP has been purchased by Riot and that they are indeed working on a new client.

For those not familiar, CrossPvP was a client project started by Boompje several years ago with the intention to serve as an alternative to Riot’s PvP.net client, aimed at being both technically better and to allow cross-platform compatibility.

As seen below, the only information so far was provided via Boompje himself in the form of several reddit comments from this thread.


 

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A new client has been one of the most talked about topics in the community and it’s nice to see Riot shed some more light on it’s progress. There is currently no estimation of when the new client will be launched.

Welcome back to Rift Pulse, a weekly roundup of all things LoL eSports. This week follows the start of the LCS, the announcement of a Mid-Season Invitational, a brand new weekly show by Riot, and more.

 

Rift Pulse Jan 20 updated


North America


  • Team Liquid announced their foray into the Challenger Scene with Liquid Academy.
  • Alex Ich will be starting as the Mid Laner for Brawl, in addition to being a substitute for Team 8.

 

Europe


  • Soaz will be playing top for Origen, finalizing their roster.
  • Fnatic has announced the formation of “Fnatic Academy“, a secondary squad with the goal of participating the the Challenger Series that will also serve as practice partners.

 

China


  •  Fzzf has announced that he is retiring from competitive play.

 

Korea


 

Tournament and Scene updates

 

  • With LCS fast approaching, Riot has put out a promotional website packed with features, roster information, a full schedule, and more.
  • Riot has announced a new “Mid-Season Invitational”  a brand new international event held in May, between the Spring and Summer splits. The event will take place in NA, the venue is still TBA.
  • Riot has released an update detailing new plans for live events in NA. Most notably, the NA LCS Summer playoffs will not be hosted at PAX Prime this year.
  • Riot has also announced Primetime League“, a new weekly show hosted by Jatt and Riv that will air on Twitch starting on January 21st, at 3PM PST.

Bjergsen

 

How was travelling between so many countries? Where was your favorite? Was it difficult adjusting to jet lag?

Bjergsen: Travelling between so many countries was something I really enjoyed, it was awesome to see so many different cultures and try a lot of different foods. My favorite was probably Korea, since it was the one we got to experience the most outside of practice times. I think fighting jetlag should only take a couple days as long as  you try to keep a healthy schedule and don’t stay up for too long. You just need to make sure you resist taking naps, it can be difficult!

 

What was boot camp like? Of all of the teams you scrimmed, who do you feel was the strongest? What did you learn most from scrims?

Bjergsen:  Boot camping was a different experience. I’ve only really had one boot camp in my life with NiP before. I think in boot camps, you figure out a lot of team problems that need to be fixed because you’re constantly practicing in a high pressure environment where all emotions come out. We definitely had some things come up, but I think we got a good hold of them which made us a better team after the boot camp was over. Of all the teams we played Samsung White was definitely the hardest, the first time we played against them we got completely stomped, but slowly worked our way up to actually contest and take games from them in scrims. The thing I learned the most is to give back to my teammates, and use my advantage to help build their advantage. If I start winning my lane I know a lot more about the options I can do to help snowball the overall team and winning the game.

 

Who was the strongest mid laner you faced during scrims?

Bjergsen: I think Faker and Pawn both played exceptionally well and had very little mistakes when I played them. They both know their limits very well and push them as far as they can, that’s what makes a great player.

 

Who was the toughest opponent you played during group stages? Did any team at the tournament surprise you?

Bjergsen:  The toughest opponent was definitely Royal Club which also shows since they made it into the final. Royal has a very distinct play style and we played right into their strengths the first game which made us basically unable to win since they play that style so well. I think if anything the biggest surprise was how handedly OMG beat Najin White Shield, I was not expecting them to get a clean sweep, nor do I think anyone did.

 

What was your mindset headed into the quarterfinals? There was a lot of talk about the importance of believing you can defeat your opponent and how it can affect you mentally if you don’t think you are capable. Did you believe you could win? What went wrong?

Bjergsen:  It’s a difficult thing to say, I do believe we had a good shot at making it all the way to the finals this year with the way the brackets worked out. But obviously we failed to deliver and I can’t blame that on anyone else than us.

Reginald and Locodoco kept making sure that we all believed we had a chance at winning, no matter how small it was. I definitely agree if we didn’t believe we at least had a chance at winning there was no way we were going to win. I think everyone in the team knew they were the better team, but we still had ways to beat them, and we could still show up big on the day. I personally believed we could win, and I think for the most part my teammates believed we had a chance as well.  

 

What is your overall impression of the tournament so far?

Bjergsen: I think the way Riot has handled the tournament and the players has been really good and I very much enjoyed finally being a part of Worlds. I was also very happy that the wildcard teams ended up having such a big impact, even though it was to my good friends in Alliance. It really shows that you can’t just expect a win against these wildcard teams, they can take you on any given day.  

 

What is the biggest thing you’ve learned from playing internationally?

Bjergsen:  The biggest thing I’ve learned is how to be able to work together as a team and how to play for the benefit of the team. One player shouldn’t have to perform extraordinarily to win, everyone just has to have a solid performance and everyone helps each other out to have a solid performance. It’s a team game and Samsung White really shows that; they win together.  

 

Amazing recently stepped down from the starting lineup. What are your thoughts on his departure? Moving forward, what are you most looking for in finding a replacement? What do you think most fits your and the team’s needs?

Bjergsen: Of course I’m really sad Amazing decided to leave the team. I shared rooms in the hotel and housing with him through the entire boot camp and he became a good friend of mine in the team. I do understand all his reasons for leaving and I can’t be upset at him, I hope he finds a place where he’ll be happy and has an escape from League every once in a while.

The main things we are looking for in a jungler would be mechanical skill, communication and work ethic. Obviously it’s really important to have good mechanical skill as a jungler for champions like Lee Sin, etc. Communication as a jungler is very important since you have to be in a dialogue with all 3 lanes at the same time to know where to be and what to do next. Work ethic is a global thing you would want from every member in the team, but it’s very important to me. It’s important the player is motivated and willing to constantly improve through solo queue and replays.

 

Prediction for the Finals?

Bjergsen:  I have to go with White, they’re an amazing team and will likely 3-0 Royal if they do their research.

 

Solomid would like to thank our fans and sponsors for supporting us. Shout out to Alienware, Logitech, and HyperX.


About the author: Tim Kimbirk is an eSports Journalist and writer with Solomid. Stay up to date on the latest interviews and features by following on twitter: @CaymusNoL

 

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EUW Community Coordinator Draggles hosted a Q&A today on all manner of topics. Here’s the breakdown.

You can read the most important details of the Q&A here.

 

 

Draggles New PortraitHey guys,

3 red posts in the last week on EUW? I suck. It’s been a busy weekend as I went to Play Expo in Manchester to check out some university esports, followed by a short spate of illness (curse you, Irish weather!) but I’m back. 

I feel we’re due for an impromptu Q&A! Feel free to ask anything and I’ll do my best to answer! 

Draggles reserves the right to not answer any question that he deems to be dangerous to his future career prospects or to Riot as a company… or anything that will make him look stupid. Trolls beware!

EDIT: You can also ask me anything, at any time, on Twitter at https://twitter.com/RiotDraggles

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When’s the first major content patch for the preseason

Draggles New PortraitSo it’s just over 3 weeks to the end of the season (November 11th 00:01 GMT). A lot of the proposed changes can be found on the PBE Boards and more specific stuff on this post. There’s a hell of a lot of changes – most will need to relearn the jungle as there are brand new items that build out of Hunter’s Machete. There’s also the possibility of a new, roaming camp in the river, as well as repeated-Dragon-killing buffs. Not all of this is going to make it in to the final preseason patch but it’s certainly an idea of our direction. 

I think this may all be hitting on the 11th but there might be a small delay between end of the 2014 Season and the preseason changes. We’ll be giving you more context on these shortly before we push the patch to live.

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Will there be more new Champions this year

Draggles New PortraitYep! But this shouldn’t really be a surprise considering our previous release schedule 

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Will Supports get some kind of love during preseason

Draggles New PortraitAs a support main, I feel you. Supports are getting the following items (as it stands currently):

Raptor’s Cloak

  • Recipe: Rejuvenation Bead + Cloth Armor + Rejuvenation Bead
  • Grants bonus movement speed when near turrets


Ohmwrecker

  • Recipe: Raptor Cloak + Kindlegem
  • Active now boosts the damage of nearby towers by 100% or prevents nearby enemy towers from attacking.
  • Stats adjusted to fit the recipe items (Health/Armor/Regen/CDR)

and the ones I’m most excited about:

Crystalline Bracer

  • Recipe: Rejuvenation Bead + Ruby Crystal
  • Grants Health and Regeneration.

Righteous Glory

  • Recipe: Catalyst + Crystalline Bracer
  • Grants Health, Mana and Regeneration
  • Active: Grants +60% MS to you and nearby allies when moving towards enemies for 2 seconds. When this speed boost ends, it emits a shockwave, slowing nearby enemy champions by 80% for one second.

^ This, to me, screams “ALISTAR”. It’s like a charging Randuin’s! I am excited!

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Will you be nerfing specific Champions

Draggles New PortraitI think we’re holding off on rebalancing specific champions until we see how the preseason plays out – it’s going to radically change the meta overall. Obviously we have a couple of patches to go before the 11th November (providing we keep to the biweekly schedule), so any last-minute tune-ups could still come about then.

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Do you think Solo players will appreciate Season 5’s meta

Draggles New PortraitCompletely understand your concerns, but I feel it’s best to see how the first couple of weeks of preseason play out before you make too many judgements. Strategic diversity/multiple win conditions are our aims for preseason, but it’s honestly something we’ll have to wait and see as to which way it goes.

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What happened to the Shaco rework teased this year

Draggles New PortraitI don’t remember seeing it announced, and the crazy thing about reworks is sometimes they fall through, or something else takes priority. I’d love to see Shaco reworked; put some character into his moveset that compliments his actual lore in the same way that Braum’s and Jinx’s moves are representative of their characters. The problem with a Shaco rework is that his stealth, his boxes and his clone are all iconic features of his moveset and so it would be tough to distance him from these.

Like in the case of Sion, before he was a axe-wielding zombie Schwarzenegger with a pink shield and a stunning look. Like, what? HOW DOES THIS MAKE SENSE? Now he’s much more thematically cohesive – much like his story where he is an unstoppable juggernaut, he has so many moves that fully represent that, while still keeping his quintessential shield/axe. I’d like to see this sort of thing happen to Shaco if and when a rework goes ahead.

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How does MMR work and how does it affect LP gain loss

Draggles New PortraitWe keep MMR calculations under wraps. I’m being completely honest here when I say that this information is also kept from most people, including me. Everything I know about matchmaking comes from this Knowledge Base article. I do know that op.gg or any third party sites don’t have access to this info, so any figures they associate with your account are estimations only.

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Is it technically possible that patches can affect ping

Draggles New PortraitIt is very rare for patches to affect ping unless we drastically change our infrastructure. Unfortunately there are so many jumps in each connection from your PC to our platform that it’s very difficult to give an “overall diagnosis” for any problem. Needless to say if the problem is immediately fixable from our end, we get on it straight away. If it’s an ISP issue we will reach out to ISPs to find out what’s going on. It could be the backbone ISP (the one that services all the ISPs in a region) or a degraded connection somewhere along the line.

Honestly your best bet, when experiencing high ping or packet loss, is to run this tool, and look for high numbers along the way. If you don’t want to do that, feel free to post them on the forum and it becomes a hell of a lot easier to specify just what’s giving your connection the hump.

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Why is Shyvana blonde in her Championship skin

Draggles New PortraitI think it fits the colour scheme of the “Championship” line of skins. Little did you know, Thresh was hiding a giant blond afro.

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What is with the recent EUW server instabilities

Draggles New PortraitWhat sort of hiccups in particular are you experiencing? We had a brief moment of downtime and a server restart a couple of weeks ago, but we’ve actually been able to really improve the quality and quantity of the uptime we have – so much so, that we’re planning to move EUNE to the datacentre in the not-too-distant future.

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Will there be more Red activity on EUW forums

Draggles New PortraitThis is always something that has affected us on the EUW forums. The fact of the matter is that EU just has fewer employees than NA, as well as having different specialisations. With cross log-in on Boards, however, this problem should be a thing of the past for English-speaking players. And in fact, if you wanted to talk to some devs right this minute, you can use your EUW login to discuss gameplay and champion/item balance or talk to the story/art team. Just make sure your region is set to EU West in the top left. Also remember timezones are a thing. With the majority of the main game devs 8 hours behind at the minimum, the crossover “quality time” period is a matter of 2 or 3 hours each day.

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How about a chat no one on either team can read

Draggles New PortraitI’d say it would be a good outlet for anger. A therapy, if you will. Also, your Summoner name seems relevant.

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Any plans on creating an item with an active dash effect

Draggles New PortraitOoh, interesting thought! Would open up a lot of champions to be viable, but then it would also become a “must buy” on every champion. Not sure we want to enforce something this heavily that it would be useful for ALL ROLES. Aside from wards, of course.

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Suggestion Sightstone grants ward charges per minute

Draggles New PortraitI don’t know if there’s anything coming for Sightstone, but I feel with some of the new jungle vision changes (killing the Raptors (currently Wraiths) gives you the ability to see invisible units for a short time the next time you are caught by an enemy ward, for example), the vision game may change all over again.

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Who are the main Rioters that represent the UK

Draggles New PortraitThe UK community team consists of Bolton, Yuka, Navigator and myself. Our plan for this year is to give you guys way more heads up on which events we’re going to be at. 

Additionally none of us are “PR”, so to speak. Every Rioter essentially controls their own PR as we’re all allowed to speak out about stuff whenever we want… within reason, of course.

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IF you could nerf one Champion, who would you choose

Draggles New PortraitOlaf. Honestly I’m glad he’s not in the meta right now because he is an absolute nightmare. *shudder*

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Do you still think about LCS Recap sometimes

Draggles New PortraitAll the time. I miss it a lot of the time. In some ways I miss the crazy late nights and the caffeine overload but I’m glad I’m now with the company that made it all possible. In fact, I’ve been here 10 months today!

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Why does Morello hate Irelia

Draggles New PortraitBecause much like Lee Sin, no matter how much you keep Irelia down, she keeps coming back.

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How do you feel about the return of the Shurima Empire

Draggles New PortraitMy thoughts on Shurima can be summed up in the form of these cakes. (Seriously I have no idea how our head office allowed me to make this contest considering the terrible pun)

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Who do you think is the best player in the world

Draggles New PortraitBest player in the world may well be DanDy. He just… doesn’t make mistakes, ever.

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If you have any questions, feel free to ask me at @NoL_Chefo or e-mail me at nolchefo@gmail.com

 

 

Skin on Sale New Banner

 

An ancient obelisk overlooks the desert, its shadow dancing across the sand as day melts into night. At its pinnacle, a lone sentinel stands watch, its eyes igniting in the fading sunlight. The glow spreads as darkness seizes the sky, spilling across jade-pierced shoulders and down a pair of whetted claws. Centuries-old dust showers the monolith as the creature unfurls its wings and screeches into the night. Guardian of the Sands Kha’Zix still stands watch.

 

 

Patrol the desert with Guardian of the Sands Kha’Zix or collect the Shurima Crest Icon, available now in the League of Legends store for 975 RP and 250 RP (or 1500 IP until September 21) respectively.

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Guardian of the Sands Kha’Ziz Video Preview

 

 

Sorry, I wasn’t able to cover this skin, so no extra PBE screenshots from me.

 

 

If you have any questions, feel free to ask me at @NoL_Chefo or e-mail me at nolchefo@gmail.com.

 

 

News Update September 8 Banner

 

Summary

Ghostcrawler answers forum drama regarding players being ignored in the development process of League and delves into the community split on reworks and who the game should be balanced for. Morello continues the discussion regarding Soraka’s upcoming rework and, more specifically, her passive making her squishier. Finally, a few suggestions about more functions for the Smart Ping wheel and an explanation on Reddit by Socrates regarding the extreme LP losses Diamond players in EUW have been experiencing lately.

TL;DR in featured comments.

 

Recent News

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Riot needs to listen more to its player base

Ghostcrawler New Portrait One of the things that really infuses the workplace here is value that players are the most important thing, period. I am convinced that Rioters really believe that in their souls and we’re pretty good about not hiring people who aren’t bought into that value. If it has felt lately that we’re putting ourselves up on a pedestal over you guys, then that’s just a communication failure on our part. I love that aspect of Riot. We aren’t the VIPs; you guys are. If you don’t feel that way, then we’re just going to have to work harder to convince you.

Now, I’m not going to comment on the story elements at all. That’s not my gig and I’m not armed with the proper context to have that conversation. Apologies in advance.

I can talk about the champion updates and related issues about gameplay such as the Fortify and defensive play topics mentioned by the OP. 

First, we don’t know better than players. We have some experience making games and hopefully we’ve hired folks with some natural talent for game development, but at the end of the day players are going to decide if they play the game or not. To put it in a bland business sentiment, this product is for you. The biggest challenge here is that players rarely speak with one voice. It may seem to you that “everyone” wanted a champion changed in a certain way or even all the “X players” really liked a specific identity that we decided to change. It’s just rarely that cut and dried. (And man, this job would be so much easier if it were.)

Remember that only a small minority of players ever post on forums, or reach out to us on Reddit or Twitter, and also remember most of you are only viewing those conversations in one or two languages at most. What may seem like universal consensus is rarely anything close to that.

And that’s okay! We’re not trying to design a game based on community vote, and you probably wouldn’t be happy with the results anyway. We do very much value player feedback and we use it to make informed decisions. That’s the reason I cracked open this (long) thread this morning — to see what you guys thought.

To provide some context on champion updates specifically, here is the way I view player sentiment. Feel free to disagree. 

Player response, again IMO, generally falls into one of these categories:

1) I am indifferent to this champion or her changes.
2) I play the champion because she is broken, so I’m not going to be happy once she is fixed.
3) I believe the champion needs to be updated, but I am excited about one particular direction, which is unlikely to be the one Riot chooses.
4) I believe the champion needs to be updated, and either Riot managed to pick the direction I liked, or I was happy just to see an update period.

Out of those four categories, you’re going to see a lot of communication from players in groups 2 and 3. Indifferent group 1 dudes are unlikely to post that they are still indifferent. Group 4 might post a little. As a result, it can feel like there is a lot of negative sentiment every time we make a change. We keep gathering data though, to make sure in the long term that the champ is getting more play and that players are enjoying playing her. To be fair, we sometimes miss the mark, or frequently a champion requires a few subsequent rounds of updates to really deliver on the promise of the update.

I’m not sure of a better way to operate other than considering player feedback in this way. I don’t think polls or votes would really be a strong way to design a game. I’m not sure how we could isolate the most hardcore or passionate players of a specific champion and redesign her with the aim of pleasing those dudes. We’re totally open to suggestions though. How would you determine the best way to update a champion? I’m not asking because we are without a process, but because some of you don’t seem happy with that process.

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He’s not wrong to say that

Ghostcrawler New PortraitThe point I was trying to make was that forum posts aren’t good quantitative (numeric) sources of data. They are excellent qualitative (value) sources of data.

Saying “everyone is saying X” doesn’t provide a ton of information, and is almost certainly not technically true. We get less information out of something like “100 posters agree with me that Nidalee sucks” and a lot more about reading something like “What I really liked about Nidalee was how she threw spears across the map. If I had wanted a champion that changed into an animal, I would have picked Shyvana.”

Again, there is a difference among “we know better than you” and “we make decisions informed by what you’re saying” and “we go implement whatever you want.” We shoot for the middle option if that wasn’t obvious. 

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Some people are happy with their favourite Champion and don’t want a rework

Ghostcrawler New PortraitOkay, that’s fair. I was describing the feedback once we’d already announced that we’re working on an update, but there are players who are reasonably happy with the state of a current champion and think he or she needs tweaks at most. Point taken.

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Why is Cassiopeia’s rework taking priority over Sion’s, Urgot’s or Poppy’s

Ghostcrawler New PortraitA lot goes into determining the order of champion updates. Here are just a few elements:

— Maybe someone is already working on another champion, but it’s taking longer.
— Maybe we’re trying to coordinate a visual update with a gameplay update.
— Maybe we don’t have a good idea yet for how to update a particular champ.
— Maybe an update won’t help because the champ in question is being dominated by another in the same role with even worse counterplay, so nobody is going to play the former until the latter is always fixed.

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Summary of player complaints on Riot’s control over League’s design

Ghostcrawler New PortraitThis is one of those threads that has gone on so long in so many different directions that it’s difficult to respond to the variety of comments. Nonetheless, I’ll try to hit a few common responses.

 


“You guys need to engage with us more.”

We’d love to, but what specifically do you mean by that? I don’t have the breadth of knowledge or even the bandwidth to debate point-by-point every topic that comes up in GD. I don’t want to get into the situation where we have to convince the community to allow us to make a change. That would be remarkably inefficient and risks feeling like the crowd sourcing model that I said we wanted to avoid. However, if there are specific opportunities to talk to players that you think we are missing, we’d definitely consider those. I am thrilled that some of you mentioned you feel like we have gotten better about providing context for design changes. That’s awesome, but there’s still a lot more we can do.

“You’re just making an argument for why you don’t have to listen to us.”

This makes me sad, because it’s the exact opposite of the impression I was trying to make. Let me try another angle. How many times do you make a point on GD or anywhere and have someone else disagree? Many of those threads go on quite long because you might think a champ is oppressive while someone else thinks they are fine, or underpowered, or just needs a small tweak. In these frequent situations where there is a lack of consensus, how are we supposed to navigate the right path, when almost every design change (or even lack of change) is going to disappoint someone? (And if you think you’ve seen a thread where “everyone” agrees on a design change, I’d love to see it.)

Again, this is how feedback works. If you tell us your concerns, your goals, your ideas, then we will consider them as we make changes. We also seek feedback after a change to see if it’s hit the mark, and then frequently iterate over the course of a few patches before we feel like we’ve really accomplished the goal of the update. Do you really want a game where we implement every change that gets posted on GD? Wouldn’t that be terrifying? If not, how would you decide who to listen to or not?

We love feedback and we do appreciate it when you take the time to post something. For all the complaints you may still have about League, I suspect you’d have a whole lot more if the feedback cycle didn’t work to improve things over time.

“You’re calling us a vocal minority.”

The point I was trying to make is that quantifying this or any forum is challenging and prone to abuse. In the end, the numbers don’t really matter. It comes down to the strength of arguments. We aren’t trying to make the majority happy. We’re trying to make everyone happy, without watering down the game, as ridiculous a goal as that sounds.

Here is another example. A couple of months ago, USA players were taking us/me to task for not nerfing Lee Sin. While he had some defenders in that thread, it was, to be fair, pretty one-sided. I said we thought he was too good at too many things. The next day the Chinese forums exploded with a lot of players who love the way Lee plays that were outraged that we would consider him broken. Were there more of them than there were US players? Was the overall passion of the Chinese players greater or less than those of the US players? I have no idea. How to you even measure something like that? In the end, we tried to figure out how we could tone him down without wrecking those aspects that players really liked about him. Nearly every change to the game plays out similarly.

“You only talk in generalizations, not specifics.”

High level, long term design is what I do. That’s the only thing I feel comfortable discussing unless I’ve had a really recent discussion with someone on a specific topic. We have been trying to get more Rioters out here so you have a bigger chance of talking to someone who is working on your exact feature. But that’s also a two way street. I’ve been doing this a long time (sixteen years!), and it’s not really possible to scare me away from forums. But when we ask other Rioters why they don’t spend time doing it, the three most common answers are: I’m scared of saying the wrong thing, it takes a huge amount of time, and the environment feels hostile. To the extent you can make the environment more positive, you’ll see more participation. I’m not saying don’t criticize. I’m saying don’t be a stereotypical internet troll when you do. Yes, it’s part of our job and I will do what I can from my end to encourage more designers to be out here.

If there are other high level topics you would appreciate me tackling (not specifics like Cass reworks or the future of lore) I’d be happy do do so.

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Why did Riot suddenly decide to rework the

Ghostcrawler New PortraitIf I am remembering correctly, the concern was that fear was really random. Sometimes a feared target would run toward you and sometimes they would run away (a particularly sad reaction for Fiddlesticks). A little bit of unpredictability provides situations in which players have to make on-the-spot choices for how to react, which is a good test of mastery and reflexes. But when it feels like RNG has more effect on your performance than your decisions, that can be really frustrating. Crit is another example, but that’s a very long discussion. 

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Communicate with Challenger and Diamond 1 players on private message boards

Ghostcrawler New PortraitWe do some of this already, and may dive deeper into it. The main risks have to do with a sense of elitism. We already try to navigate a knife’s edge of perceptions about whether we design the game only for the pros or only for the average player. The thought that pros (or even top tiered players in general) might have a bat phone to reach the developers in a secret conversation in which other players can’t even participate rubs other players understandably the wrong way. The top-tiered players themselves get nervous of their comments being used against them, especially if it’s private correspondence that becomes leaked.

Finally, there are expert players who don’t have great insight into which changes would be good for the game overall, and there are Bronze players who can’t execute on plays but have a really good sense for specific changes that would improve the game for everyone. This is the whole “just because you eat a lot of good food, that doesn’t make you a chef,” argument.

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New Soraka won’t be able to build health and will loses resists

Morello New PortraitOh Linna, I’m glad to see that some thing never change. Our war shall never resolve!

On a serious note, I’m excited to crack open how to make a healer with gameplay in a PvP game. Vesh has worked very hard to try to make this a reality, and the previoust costs/downsides with things like blue healers or even other LoL champions don’t do well when you give a character bonkers haling to friends.

I’ve been against healing as a role a long time – I’ve learned my problems are with its execution and lack of decisions (for themselves or enemies) that’s problematic. So, we’ve take a stab at fixing that.

You should be scared as Soraka. You’re trying to heal people who should kill people and protect people for you. You can still buy GA and have 80% of the value in defense. You’re not going to have 4000 HP and 200 armor/100MR on Soraka. As a healer, being tanky WOULD be the natural build, so we have to prevent that case.

THIS can let us make a character who SUPPORTS by HEALING to an unprecendented degree in LoL. No one else can do this. You want support to change a game? You want new reasons to pick a character? I hear you – super clearly.

It’s not all buffs. It’s hard ass choices.

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It’s a scary concept of how she may be too squishy with this passive

Morello New PortraitIt’s definitely scary – on this we agree. I think there’s three conversation points:

1) I fundamentally believe if Soraka is allowed to get tanky, we’ll have to gut her. This release valve is there to prevent this and allow her to be good.

2) New Soraka is both more narrow and more unique. Picking Soraka is very different than picking another support. If we want champions to have a unique strategic identity and have a reason “to be played,” this is important.

3) The current passive can be tuned into obliteration if it’s actually a problem, but we need a release valve. I know Soraka wants AR/MR/HP – that’s why we have to discourage it or it will run afoul of 1), and Soraka will be gutted, and we might as well have not done anything and left her in the dumpster.

Tradeoffs are a huge component of good design, and sustainable champions. We’ve chosen these ones because we believe it will allow us to actually make a real healer character.

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Follow Up

Morello New PortraitThat’s basically how insane her HPS and saving gets. It’s unlike anything we have on heals…2s Cooldown, high AP ratio, and big gains. You NEED to kill Soraka or a fight is unwinnable in this model.

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What if she’s so good at healing that she can't be allowed to be tanky

Morello New PortraitYes – this is the first time we’ve done that. My expectation is not that people get super excited about this, but instead it makes it so she can function and not get kneecapped as soon as she’s good.

This design technique acts as a release valve for bullshit scenarios without requiring us to murder the core functions and unique abilities of the character. A Critical Guideline of Soraka is that she must be vulnerable to being killed while healing to allow her to be an insane health-refiller. This means we have to put preventative measures in there to ensure she stays what way – especially as items will be buffed/nerfed/added/removed long after Soraka’s out.

So Soraka can’t get tanky. That’s the whole point.

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So you don't think that we need a

Reinboom New PortraitOops! Most of my post was focused at the “Ult up in…” (mainly).

I actually like “Warded”, it’s very positional, very informative, and difficult to describe in current tools. It’s exactly the type of problem that the radial menu would be perfect to solve.

For that I think the issue there is more “Where do we put this?”. Which is solvable (Another radial menu perhaps?).

If a team looks at the problemspace in more depth, I think that’ll be the real difficulty, thinking out in the blue.

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Why don’t you remove the

Reinboom New PortraitThat’s a consideration that’s been passed around quite a bit.

My worry there is that of familiarity.

Anecdotal case: When we were first developing the radial menu, the left and right were actually swapped.

We actually had it internally for nearly 9 months before we released it IIRC (the team prioritized the then new HUD and the item shop above the radial menu so it got set aside for awhile). That’s a LOT of time to get familiar to something in play behavior.

Even now, personally, I will accidentally ping as though it was what it used to be because the menu optimized around muscle memory. We flipped it for good reasons, but it’s still quite disruptive as an individual.

That’s a type of disruption I would rather avoid if possible for other players. Again, muscle memory is super significant here.

That said, a few of us have played with the idea of other types of ping as well. Establishing a different input behavior rather than replacing an existing one could open us up to do more. (And it means we don’t let you guys sink in to the muscle memory case in the replacement version).

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Cassiopeia’s rework is expanding beyond her just being a lane bully

Morello New Portrait Very true – Cassiopeia – WHEN powerful – is a lane bully only. That’s why you pick her and what she does.

While we were doing a little texture update, we had a really fast, low-scope idea to help fix her up and make her into something other than a “remove ability to lane champion” and focus on the other identity she does have; AP super-carry.

We don’t balance around alternate maps. That’s why I don’t like the idea of more maps, because they erode the game for low benefit. I do think the proper way to FIGHT stagnation and staleness is to add identities to “why do I pick this champion instead of X?” Cass’s low-scope changes are an attempt to address that, as opposed to “I take her to beat the shit out of people when they can’t fight me.”

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Extreme LP losses in Diamond EUW

Socrates New PortraitHey all, here is what’s going on in this case:

  1. The top 200 challenger spots were protected by a concept called ‘clamping’ before Master Tier was introduced. This ensured the top 200 dudes on the server had both the highest LP and MMR. This greatly slowed gains and losses, making small gains appear normal. Removing clamping means gains (both up and down) are more fluid now. Since in some cases clamping was actually protecting players from falling down too quickly, these players will see some larger losses and smaller gains until they’re back where the system expects them to be.

  2. In other tiers (bronze – plat) league standing is a very accurate mapping of player skill, but there is a buffer to slow players LP losses temporarily if they start to go on a losing trend. Since clamping was removed, but challenger and master must contain the very best players, the loss shielding is thinner in diamond than other tiers. In other words, gains and losses can feel more swingy.

Some of the gains and losses here do look a bit extreme but should become more stable over time. We’ll be monitoring how LP changes stabilize over the next few days and evaluating if we need to make adjustments or not based on the results.

This should have been more explicitly called out in our messaging around this to prepare players for the shift. I will work with the messaging team to update the original post around this.

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If you have any questions, feel free to ask me at @NoL_Chefo or e-mail me at nolchefo@gmail.com.

 

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Another entry in Riot’s design values dev blogs, this time covering giving players meaningful choices to make in the game.

 

 

Hey all,

It’s time for another entry in our ongoing series on the Design Values of League of Legends! Today we’ve got Lead Champion Designer Andrei “Meddler” Van Roon, here to talk about meaningful choices in League of Legends. This is a topic that goes fairly deep, so let’s just let him get started!

 

 Chris ‘Pwyff’ Tom

 

 

Why does Meaningful choice matter

To us, meaningful choices are one of the key things that allow a PvP game to have depth. The ability to make decisions that directly impact that state of the game is of absolute importance in driving satisfaction and mastery, and we always want to reward those make the best decisions.

Multiple attractive choices also allow for variety in experience, with games following many different paths. Meaningful choices (rather than single best choices) allow players to shape the state of the game based off their own preferences and what they feel they’re best at.

 

What makes a choice meaningful

Meaningful choices require that the player have sufficient understanding of the consequences of their decisions. Without knowing (or at least being able to predict) what’s going to happen, a ‘choice’ of option basically becomes random. That’s not to say that the player needs to know every detail, or they need to see exactly how their decision will pan out – just enough to make an informed choice.

Significant difference between possible outcomes is also required. Clarity is nice, but if the choice is between a set of almost identical options – or if all choices result in the same, final outcome – there’s no significance to the choice in the first place.

It’s also important that the choices offered are actually accessible. If there are three possible choices of strategy but two can be executed by only the top 0.01% of players (reaction speed, required actions per second, etc) that effectively means there isn’t a choice either.

Finally, for a choice to be meaningful there need to be situations where multiple options are potentially valid. If there’s always one obvious correct answer, it’s not a choice but a puzzle to be solved. Sometimes it’s okay for there to be one right decision (see below), but games defined by questions that, once answered, stay answered forever (otherwise known as ‘solved games’) face the challenge of staying fresh (once again, if the focus is on meaningful PvP interactions).

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Why sometimes a lack of choice is OK

Meaningful choice adds a lot to a game, but it’s not an essential part of every element. Skillshots or challenging combos, for example, can be satisfying skill tests for many, even if the correct play is the same every time. Additionally – and this is particularly true in story driven genres – plot, setting or character development can often justify a lack of choice.

In League, a lack of meaningful choice is worth accepting either because of the benefits a single option brings to the rest of the game, or because the choice is meaningful to other players. For example, participating in the vision game is almost mandatory if you want to be a successful team, but vision control in League of Legends creates a lot of interesting play – particularly around contested objectives.

Sometimes it’s better to simply not offer a choice in the first place. For example, having a deep, unified competitive scene on Summoner’s Rift – rather than a fragmented one split over multiple maps/modes – better supports our goals of making League of Legends a long-lasting, competitive game with deep potential for skill development. That’s not to say other maps or game modes don’t have interesting things to offer, but there are many benefits (and tradeoffs) for choosing to focus on one.

 

Different ways to look at choice

There are many different ways to present a meaningful choice, and I’ll run through a few examples:

 

Single versus Constant

Single choices often have a large impact on strategy and they commonly influence how future decisions in the game will be presented. This isn’t to say that single choices have right or wrong answers, but five strategically mismatched choices against five strategically cohesive choices can be very tough.

  • Utility mid like Lulu or an assassin like Zed?

Constant choices, on the other hand, are ones that influence the game by inches – each time you make a conscious decision, it’s just one step toward (or away from) victory.

  • Stay in lane and farm, go gank bot, try to steal the enemy’s blue buff?

 

Always Available versus Windowed

Choices that are always available are mostly related to mastery of efficiency. Knowing when to use something rarely wins a game single-handedly, but juggling the optimal timing of when to use many things is often what’s needed to edge out a close victory.

  • Should I use my potion when I’m near full health so that I can optimize my jungle efficiency? Should I save it if I’m thinking about recalling soon?

Windowed choices are ones that are only available under certain circumstances and can therefore carry more weight than always available ones. It’s like a form of efficiency, but also knowing what a windowed choice will lead to in the future.

  • While at the shop, do I spend my gold while I can, or do I save up for something I can’t afford yet? If I’m spending my gold, do I grab a Vamp Scepter or Boots and a Long Sword?

 

Tactical versus Strategic

Tactical choices are typically the ones that relate to pure combat mechanics and in-the-moment decision-making.

  • Which angle is Morgana going to fire Dark Binding at? Which way should I try and dodge, if at all?

Strategic choices, on the other hand, are ones that are focused on long-term decisions that dictate the pace and future opportunities within the game.

  • Do we try and fight them at Baron or do we let them have it while we go for an inhibitor?

 


While some of the above are direct examples of how we approach meaningful choices in League of Legends, I’d like to also look to the future before this entry gets too long.

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Looking forward where we can do better

While providing meaningful choices is a core value that we design around, it’s not something we’ve always delivered on well enough. As a result, there are a number of parts of the game we’re looking to make improvements to offer more interesting decision points. Have a few examples:

 

Strategy

We’d like League of Legends to have a broader range of possible options when it comes to how teams try to win a game. While this does rely heavily on champion diversity to influence strategy, we hope for there to be many ways to close out a game – through objective control, split pushing, straight teamfighting, getting strategic picks on solitary enemies, and beyond.

 

Champions

Some champions share too similar a niche with other champions, making the choice between them more a question of who’s more powerful than what particular skillset you want on your team. We try to emphasize this distinction where possible – for example, both Trundle and Jax are fighters, but they are picked for a team for very different reasons (initiation, disengage, and strength against tanky targets versus ramping damage with strong offensive scaling combined with a high effectiveness against auto attackers).

In contrast, Mundo and Shyvana do share a bit too similar a niche, with both being tanky fighters that deal AoE damage over an extended period of time as they try to wear down a target via movement speed. That’s not to say they’re bad champions or that there aren’t differences between them (one is better at long skirmishes, the other has superior initiation), but we can certainly be offering a more interesting choice between the two. Trying to find distinct gameplay spaces for champions is one of the core things we’re focusing on with both new champions and champion updates.

 

Items

Some roles have a range of interesting itemization choices throughout the game. AP casters, for example get to make choices like Tear of the Goddess or Fiendish Codex early, and Zhonya’s or Deathcap later on. Other roles, however, have fewer interesting options available to them. Marksmen have generally followed very similar build paths to each other with low variance. As a result, we’re trying to find ways to offer more distinct and appealing options, like the changes to Bloodthirster to better position it as a high end defensive AD item. In comparison, the old Bloodthirster – due to it having the highest AD in the game along with lifesteal – basically said, “Build this on every marksman that auto attacks or uses spells” (that is, all of them).

 

And onward

The above are just a few examples of where we think we can offer more meaningful choices for the future of League of Legends. Remember that this can go even more in-depth in systems like summoner spells, runes, masteries, or even lane positions on the map itself. Also, if you think there are unique opportunities where we can offer more depth or places where you think we’ve failed to offer sufficient choice, feel free to leave a comment below.


 Andrei “Meddler” Van Roon

 

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If you have any questions, feel free to ask me at @NoL_Chefo or e-mail me at nolchefo@gmail.com.


Dev Blog: Exploring Runeterra

September 4th, 2014

 

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The sands of League’s lore have been shifting towards new ways of storytelling and a growing focus on locations and cultures in Runeterra, LoL’s world. Find out why that is in the latest Dev Blog released by Riot.

 

DEV BLOG: EXPLORING RUNETERRA


First of all, though these are technically my words, I’m just one of the many people involved with storytelling at Riot, and what you’re about to read is inspired by their collective passion. League of Legends covers a lot of ground at this point, but is ultimately always centered on the gameplay at its heart, so the idea that there are a lot of Rioters connected to narrative might surprise some. That’s a big part of why we’d like to talk to you about the current state of League’s story, as well as some of the changes you’ve seen (and will continue to see) as part of our evolving approach to storytelling.


STORYTELLING AS LEAGUE EVOLVES


Evolution is one of the core elements of League of Legends. Champions, events, skins, splash art, and the maps themselves are just some of the avenues through which we seek to continually level up every facet of the game. We want League to always feel current through design balance, art updates, and new character themes and stories.

We want League to always feel current through design balance, art updates, and new character themes and stories.

That means we have to be willing to look at work we’ve done in the past and honestly reevaluate it. In some cases – say, with a champion update – the original concept is mostly sound (or even timelessly awesome!) and all we have to do is bump things up to modern standards. Sometimes, however, we look back at decisions that made perfect sense when we originally made them, but are now at odds with our design values and ultimately limit our ability to continually improve League of Legends. That’s unacceptable, and in such situations we seek to aggressively reimagine content in a way that realizes its full potential.

As players ourselves, it’s easy to get excited about upcoming developments – but you, the players, don’t always have visibility into what’s coming down the pipe, or why. And so we’ve learned how crucial it is to communicate changes in ways that give you a sense of why choices are being made and what benefits can be expected. In this case, that first requires a bit of backstory.

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A BIT OF BACKSTORY


In the early days of League, we created a fictional background that would justify how players could control champions during games. We came up with concepts like Summoners, Fields of Justice, an Institute of War, and indeed, the League of Legends itself – all in an attempt to provide fictional context for in-game action.

After a while, these early choices began to create unexpected problems. Every new champion needed a reason to join and remain in the League, and as their number grew, the net result was that over time the world started to feel, well, small, and eventually less interesting. The institutions we’d designed fostered creative stagnation, limiting the ways that champions, factions and Runeterra itself could grow and change. Furthermore, the very idea of all-powerful Summoners made Champions little more than puppets manipulated by godlike powers. The background we’d created to explain in-game action was ultimately restricting the potential narrative development of the game’s defining characters.

Faced with these limitations, our use of narrative elements tightly bound to the original vision (Journals of Justice, Judgments, etc.) dwindled, because they felt fundamentally restrictive to our hopes for a more vibrant and expansive world. In response, we started (with efforts like the Freljord event and recent champion bios) to tell stories that explored the furthest limits of League’s original creative framework.

Time and again, we’ve heard players clamor for more story, fueling our desire to make the necessary changes to bring you bigger and better glimpses of Runeterra and its inhabitants. A lot of you have voiced your thoughts on these changes, and in a variety of ways – with enthusiasm, ideas for further new approaches, or even concern. In all these cases, we’re grateful for your interest, and we’re committed to both pushing narrative development further and doing a better job of providing insight into what’s going on under the hood with story.

nc-ionia


WHERE WE ARE TODAY


At a very broad level, we’ve decided to push League’s story beyond its original focus on explaining in-game action and forge a new narrative path for Runeterra – a world in which the factions and champions we all know and love have full freedom to grow, travel, and kick ass on a worldwide scale. From champion interactions to bios to events (and beyond), we aim to expand the scope of League’s story and pursue a more dynamic and wide-ranging world fit for the outsized capabilities and personalities of our champions.

Story has the potential to affect every element of League of Legends, so the decision to venture into new narrative territory wasn’t made quickly or capriciously. The need for change only became apparent over time, and the choice was made only after a great deal of deliberation. Further, we want you to know that this new approach is focused on opening up possibilities and unlocking a wider, more fully-fledged world – the point isn’t to tear up older stories that form their own cherished part of League’s history.

At a very broad level, we’ve decided to push League’s story beyond its original focus on explaining in-game action and forge a new narrative path for Runeterra…

But what does that mean?

Essentially, it means that the game and story aren’t one-to-one copies of each other. League as a game is about creating awesome gameplay, while League as a story is about creating deep, vibrant characters and factions inhabiting an expansive world. We don’t want to limit story because of gameplay, just like we wouldn’t limit gameplay because of story – we want both of them (and all the other elements of League) to have the freedom to be as great as they possibly can be.

Does this mean older story efforts like the Journal of Justice and League Judgments are meaningless? Of course not. In the same way that we can go back and enjoy old books, shows, films, art, and comics that have been superseded by more recent interpretations of the same material, League’s original lore remains a cherished part of its history. From comic books to classic literature, exploration of the same creative space in vastly different ways is a natural part of storytelling.

Runeterra is a big place, with lots of room to be explored in different ways by different people – including players.

nc-shurima


WHERE WE’RE GOING


When it comes to storytelling, things will continue forward much as they have done already– League as a whole evolves steadily over time, often in small steps, and the same is true of its story. We’ll continue to explore Runeterra through various mediums, in chunks both large and small, and we hope you’ll come along for the ride and continue to share your ideas and feedback.

The point is simply that League of Legends constantly evolves, and, as it does, its narrative needs to evolve as well.

Communication is where you should really notice a difference. Similarly to the gameplay team’s ongoing Design Values series, we’ll be back with future Dev Blogs discussing both our latest narrative efforts and our general principles when it comes to developing story in League. For example, one of the principles we’d love to discuss further is our focus on ensuring that champion identities remain consistent regardless of where you encounter them; for example, Darius should always feel the same regardless of whether he’s administering an axe in a story piece, the game, or a cinematic. Exploring champions’ backstories and motivations beyond what you see in the game doesn’t mean they’ll suddenly start feeling like different characters; what it does do is offer a huge spectrum of options for fleshing out personalities and deepening connections.

The point is simply that League of Legends constantly evolves, and, as it does, its narrative needs to evolve as well. We couldn’t be more thrilled to share this process with you and to hear what you have to say about it. More than anything, we want to rekindle the conversation with you. What stories do you want us to tell? What parts of Runeterra would you like to see?

We’re excited to keep exploring the possibilities, and we hope you are too.

Tommy Gnox (but really the whole Narrative team)



Artwork of Runeterra:


Freljord_Wallpaper Ionia_Wallpaper Shurima_Wallpaper Bilgewater_Full



If you have any questions, feel free to ask me at @NoL_Chefo or e-mail me at nolchefo@gmail.com.


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Devblog on Mastery Banner

Riot have released another awesome devblog, this time detailing what it takes to master League!

 

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Pwyff New PortraitIt’s the second entry in our ongoing League of Legends design values! Last time we had environment and clarity designer Richard “Nome” Liu go in-depth on why Clarity is important in League of Legends. Up this week is Riot Games’ Vice President of Game Design, Tom “Zileas” Cadwell, here to talk to one of League’s most central themes: the pursuit of mastery. 

Zileas has been a part of Riot Games for a long time and he’s actually the one who first introduced several of the terms used in our design values series – like Counterplay. Today, however, Zileas will be focusing more on mastery as it relates to every design decision we make in League and why it’s so important to the game as a whole. Onward!

 

 

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Players are driven to play different game genres for different reasons. In MMOs, it might be a feeling of progression or social achievement. In single-player, story-focused games, it might be about immersion, or making your way through a deep narrative. In the MOBA genre, we believe the main thing that motivates players to stick around is the pursuit of mastery.

Whether you’re trying to be the best League player in the world or you’re just picking up on how to last hit, playing League of Legends is about continually growing and becoming a better player. We believe that players who play League are seeking mastery, and our design philosophy is deeply tied to this idea. For our part, we hope to make a player’s journey endlessly rich and fulfilling; someone who adapts quickly and instinctually should be rewarded as much as the one who spends days figuring out the most optimal path forward – both are pursuing mastery in their own unique ways.

We’ve identified three major areas of mastery: personal expertise, teamwork, and adaptability.


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Personal Expertise

 

Personal expertise is the direct skill you bring in controlling your character to win a fight or earn gold. It’s your ability to last hit, execute a basic combo, dodge and land skill shots, or make an informed decision in a fight. Some of the ways we can support personal expertise include:

Creating optimization paths for champions is a design strategy we’ve spent more time on over the years. When we design or update champions, we ask if there are multiple levels of mastery possible – places where a player can fine-tune their skills to become even better over time. Yasuo and his passive, Way of the Wanderer, is a good example of growing mastery, where maximizing Flow through movement and ability use – and ensuring that large flow increases aren’t ‘wasted’ on a full bar – can separate the good Yasuos from the great Yasuos.

Rewarding consistent demonstrations of skill is an important philosophy for us, and this means smoothing out cases where this isn’t true. As an example, system overhauls are large projects that try to build more potential for mastery. We continue to look at League and ask ourselves: when and where are players unable to use their skill to shine? And where these problems exist, is there a way we can fix it?

Here are some examples from the 2014 pre-season changes where we made system overhauls to reward consistent skill:

  • Reducing team snowballing allowed players to win more often via their skill than their stats. When teams snowball out of control prematurely it becomes impossible for the opposing team, even with amazing play, to recover. On the other hand, a really ‘fed’ single player can still be focused and killed.
  • Stronger support scaling allows support players to continue to show their skill into the late game, rather than being overshadowed by the rest of their team in importance. When your power level is too different from other players in the game, even highly skilled players can feel like they’re not making a difference.

Counterplay, which will be further detailed by Morello in another blog, is the philosophy of designing champions to be challenging to master for both the player playing them and the opponent trying to beat them. When two champions fight, we want nuance, thought, and timing to matter in both directions, which means the best player should win. You’re only as good as the opponents you can beat, and a champion that lacks counterplay is one which, if executed perfectly, leaves their opponent with shallow or nonexistent response choices.


Thresh_Screenshot_01  Thresh_Screenshot_02

 

 

Teamwork

 

Teamwork is the ability to read a teammate’s intentions while also giving cues in turn, or the ability to stay positive when setbacks occur, or the ability to do what’s best for the team at all times.

We design for teamwork in two major areas: teamplay and team incentives.

Teamplay is a design philosophy similar to counterplay, and Statikk will be going more in-depth in his dev blog. In short, if a particular strategy or set of abilities become stronger with increasingly effective team coordination, teamplay is there. At a basic level, this means that we have to design in a way where your teammates need to care what you’re doing, and react to it. To do this, we try to make abilities, like Thresh’s Dark Passage, which greatly increase in power when the team collaborates effectively.

Team Incentives encourage players to play as a team. Basic systems like assist gold are an example of this, as are objectives like towers, dragon and baron. We’ve also positioned all of League of Legend’s out-of-game rewards and ranked play (wins/losses) entirely around team success in order to reward players for playing as a team. This has the final effect of helping players understand that the path to mastery must involve the mastery of teamwork.


KhaZix_evolve

 

 

Adaptability

 

Adaptability is both your ability to learn and respond to new ideas, new threats and new changes, along with your ability to play in a variety of styles. Different players are adaptable in different ways. Some choose to pick up a large number of champions, while others spend that time deeply mastering one along a variety of builds. We try to support both, but fundamentally believe that to pursue mastery in League is about being an adaptable player.

Our primary method of rewarding adaptability is through system and play balance changes. We aspire to keep as many champions as possible viable at a competitive level (to mixed success, admittedly), and also spend a lot of time trying to increase the amount of viable team-level strategies. The better balanced the game is, the more we can reward players who remain adaptable against a wide breadth of threats, and similarly reward them for investing time in learning to play less-popular champions and strategies.

 

 

Closing Thoughts

 

We’re committed to continuing to improve the potential for mastery in League of Legends, and look forward also helping you understand the ways we can achieve this goal (or give us feedback if you feel we’re not!). We fundamentally believe a game where you know you’re getting better with effort is also a game that’s rewarding to play. We also hope you’ll remain committed to your own mastery – and that this blog can serve as a reminder to challenge yourself to master new skills, champions and strategies!

 Tom “Zileas” Cadwell

 

 

If you have any questions, feel free to ask me at @NoL_Chefo or e-mail me at nolchefo@gmail.com.